CFL

CFL, players' union reach tentative deal on new CBA

The CFL on Wednesday announced it has come to terms with the players' association on a new collective agreement, subject to approval by the league's board of governors and a ratification vote by the players.

Current 5-year agreement was set to expire on Saturday

CFL commissioner Randy Ambrosie no doubt is smiling Wednesday after the league and its players' union came to terms on a tentative collective agreement. The deal is subject to approval by the league's board of governors and a ratification vote by the players. (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press/File)

The tentative agreement between the CFL and CFL Players' Association gives some American players additional job security.

According to two sources, the proposed three-year deal includes a new ratio for three American starters who've been with a team for three seasons or have four years of combined CFL experience. The clause would prevent clubs from being able to replace the three with younger, less expensive players.

Not only would it give the American players more job security but also helps a team build continuity.

The tentative deal also leaves the Canadian ratio intact. A CFL team's 44-man game-day roster must consist of 21 Canucks, of which seven must be starters on offence or defence.

The CFL and CFL Players' Association reached a tentative deal early Wednesday after two straight marathon bargaining sessions. They met into the night Monday, reconvened early Tuesday and continue talking until early Wednesday morning before coming to terms.

Pending ratification

The new deal is pending ratification by the players and acceptance by the league's board of governors. CFL officials were expected to approve it at a board meeting Wednesday in Toronto.

The CFLPA presented the agreement to team reps Wednesday and it was expected to then be given to the union membership later on.

A ratification vote date hasn't been divulged but is not expected to be held until sometime next week. The current contract is set to expire Saturday.

With a tentative deal in place, players are expected to report for the start of CFL training camps Sunday.

Improved medical benefits

Other proposals reportedly in the tentative deal, according to the sources, include:

— A rookie salary scale that's said to start at $85,000 for the first overall pick, then go down from there depending upon draft position. Currently there's no rookie cap in the CFL.

— A proposal to incorporate a "global" player.

— Players to receive three years of medical coverage, up from just one year currently. Health and safety was a majority priority during bargaining for the CFLPA.

— Canadian quarterbacks to count towards the Canadian ratio of 21 nationals on each team's game-day roster. The current deals calls for three quarterbacks of any nationality on the roster.

— Players to receive 20 per cent of revenues from the CFL TV deal as well as commissioner Randy Ambrosie's CFL 2.0 initiative.

— CFL salary cap to continue to increase by $50,000 annually. Minimum salaries are to increase to $65,000 from $54,000 in second year of new deal.

Deal runs concurrent with TV deal

The tentative agreement would run concurrent to the CFL's television contract with TSN, which goes through the '21 campaign. It also gives both sides time to see what fruit the 2.0 initiative bears.

Acceptance of the deal would eliminate the prospect of an ugly two-tiered CFL player strike. Had there been no deal reached by Saturday, players with the B.C. Lions, Saskatchewan Roughriders, Winnipeg Blue Bombers and Montreal Alouettes would've been in a legal strike position come the start of training camp Sunday and wouldn't have reported.

Players on CFL teams in Alberta (Edmonton and Calgary) and Ontario (Ottawa, Toronto and Hamilton) would've had to show up because they wouldn't have been in a legal strike position until May 23. But that's when the union could've orchestrated a full work stoppage.

However, Ramsay continually stated the CFLPA's top priority always was to secure a fair and equitable deal with the CFL.

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