Sports

Democrats introduce bill allowing NCAA athletes to organize and bargain

College athletes would have the right to organize and collectively bargain with schools and conferences under a bill introduced Thursday by Democrats in the House and Senate.

Bill would amend National Labour Relations Act to define athletes receiving aid as employees

NCAA athletes would have the right to organize and collectively bargain with schools and conferences under the new bill that was introduced Thursday. (Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

College athletes would have the right to organize and collectively bargain with schools and conferences under a bill introduced Thursday by Democrats in the House and Senate.

Senators Chris Murphy and Bernie Sanders announced the College Athletes Right to Organize Act.

A companion bill was introduced in the House.

The bill would amend the National Labour Relations Act to define college athletes who receive direct grant-in-aid from their schools as employees.

A movement at Northwestern to unionize college football players was rejected by the National Labour Relations Board in 2015.

The NCAA has turned to Congress for help as it tries to reform its rules to allow athletes to be paid for endorsements, personal appearances and autographs.

WATCH | NCAA equity issues move from women's basketball to volleyball:

NCAA equity issues move from women's basketball to volleyball

Sports

4 months ago
7:41
Morgan Campbell, Meghan McPeak and Dave Zirin sit down to talk about the continued equality issues that plague the NCAA. 7:41

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