Sports

Heavyweight champion Fury wants off BBC sports award nomination list

Boxing champion Tyson Fury took to social media on Wednesday to square off with the BBC over his inclusion in the British broadcaster's shortlist for Sports Personality of the Year award.

Self-styled 'Gyspsy King' says love of the people is the only affirmation he needs

On Wednesday, WBC heavyweight champ Tyson Fury took to social media to square off with the BBC over his nomination for the British broadcaster's Sports Personality of the Year award. (Steve Marcus/Reuters)

Boxing champion Tyson Fury took to social media on Wednesday to square off with the BBC over his inclusion in the British broadcaster's shortlist for Sports Personality of the Year award.

In his message, the WBC heavyweight champion – who despite being nearly six foot eight is a mix of hammer and grace in the ring – said his career doesn't need any additional affirmation.

"This is a message for BBC sports and their SPOTY award - please take me off your list as I'm the people's champion and have no need for verification or any awards.

"I know who I am and what I've done in the sport. I have the love of the people which means more to me than all the awards in the world. To anyone who supports me, don't vote."

The other nominees include: cricketer Stuart Broad, jockey Hollie Doyle, Formula 1's Lewis Hamilton, footballer Jordan Henderson and snooker star Ronnie O'Sullivan.

The yearly award is meant to honour British athletes who have excelled. 

Fury, however, was always a controversial choice. Despite becoming the heavyweight champ in February by defeating American Deontay Wilder, the self-styled "Gyspy King" has previously served a two-year ban for cocaine use. 

He's also currently being investigated by anti-doping authorities over allegations that a member of his team bribed a farmer to provide a false alibi after failing a drug test in 2015. 

Fury chalked it up to either eating uncastrated wild boar or accidentally having ingested contaminated supplements. 

This is only the second time in the history of the award that a short-listed athlete has asked to be removed — Fury was also involved in the first. 

In 2015, Olympic long jump champion Greg Rutherford asked to be removed— citing unease with the boxer's sexist and homophobic views during an on-air rant. The BBC later convinced Rutherford to remain on the list. 

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