NBA

Dwyane Wade apologizes for anthem flap in Miami-Toronto series

Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade apologized Monday to anyone who was offended by his actions before Saturday's Toronto-Miami matchup, when he took a few extra warm-up shots at the beginning of the singing of "O Canada."

Heat guard took warm-up shots during 'O Canada' before Game 3

Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade issued the apology after Miami's 94-87 victory that tied the Eastern Conference semifinals on Monday. (Issac Baldizon/NBAE via Getty Images)

Dwyane Wade was the first Miami Heat player to line up for the playing of "O Canada" on Monday night.

Lesson learned.

The Heat guard apologized Monday to anyone who was offended by his actions before Saturday's Toronto-Miami matchup, when he took a few extra warm-up shots at the beginning of the singing of "O Canada." Video showed Wade continued his pregame routine for about 20 seconds before he took his spot in line with the rest of his teammates.

Wade issued the apology after Miami's 94-87 victory that tied the Eastern Conference semifinals. Game 5 is in Toronto on Wednesday.

Wade often doesn't line up for the pregame anthem until he makes a certain shot, though during most games in Miami the playing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" is usually preceded by a brief ceremony honouring military personnel — which buys him a few more seconds to line up before the anthem begins.

When the Raptors, Canada's only NBA team, come to Miami the anthem schedules are altered to accommodate the length of two songs instead of one. The military ceremony remains in its usual place in the Heat pregame routine.

The NBA spoke with the Heat about the matter and asked the team to ensure pregame routines wouldn't interfere with the anthem performances going forward. Some Canadian politicians complained about Wade's perceived slight on Twitter, including Toronto Mayor John Tory.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.