NBA

Former NBA commissioner David Stern remains in serious condition after brain surgery

Former NBA commissioner David Stern remains in serious condition following emergency brain surgery last week.

77-year-old suffered brain hemorrhage in Manhattan on Thursday

David Stern had a brain hemorrhage while having lunch in New York on Dec. 12. (Mike Young/Getty Images)

Former NBA commissioner David Stern remains in serious condition following emergency brain surgery last week.

The league said Tuesday that Stern is surrounded by his loved ones and receiving great care. The NBA says both the league and Stern's family appreciate the outpouring of support.

The 77-year-old Stern suffered a brain hemorrhage Thursday while having lunch in New York.

Stern served exactly 30 years as the NBA's longest-tenured commissioner before Adam Silver replaced him on Feb. 1, 2014. Stern has remained affiliated with the league with the title of commissioner emeritus and has remained active in his other interests, such as sports technology.

(CBC Sports)

Stern oversaw the growth of the NBA into a league whose games were televised in more than 200 countries and territories and in more than 40 languages. The league was playing a regular-season game in Mexico City between Dallas and Detroit on Thursday night when it announced the news about Stern.

Stern stayed busy after stepping down as commissioner, taking trips overseas on the league's behalf, doing public speaking and consulting. He was inducted to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2014.

Stern oversaw the addition of seven franchises and the creation of the WNBA and NBA Development League, now called the G League. He had a hand in numerous initiatives that changed the league, including drug testing, the salary cap and implementation of a dress code.

He wouldn't even let staffers use the word "retire" when he left his office, because he never intended to stop working. He has kept an office in New York and regularly travels into the city for work on the projects he pursued once he turned the league over to Silver.

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