MLB

MLB players respond to league's lengthy return plan

The baseball players' association gave management a wide-ranging response Thursday to a 67-page proposed set of protocols for a season to be played during the coronavirus pandemic.

67-page proposal sets protocols for season to be played

The Toronto Blue Jays and Pittsburgh Pirates are seen during a spring training game on March 12 in Bradenton, Fla. Major League Baseball and its players are working on the details of a return-to-play plan, including safety measures. (Carlos Osorio/The Associated Press)

The baseball players' association gave management a wide-ranging response Thursday to a 67-page proposed set of protocols for a season to be played during the coronavirus pandemic.

Management had presented the union and the 30 teams the proposed draft last Friday.

The union said Thursday it addressed: protections for high-risk players, access to pre- and post-game therapies, testing frequency, protocols for positive tests, in-stadium medical personnel and sanitization procedures.

Players viewed many of the concepts in the original draft as over-the-top, such as arriving in uniform at the ballparks, a prohibition on them leaving without team permission and a ban on guests other than immediate family members. Players also objected to a ban on the use of showers and hydrotherapy.

WATCH | Manfred confident about reaching agreement with players:

Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred tells CNN on Thursday he is confident Major League Baseball will reach an agreement with the Major League Baseball Players Association to return to action this season. 1:09

The union wants more frequent testing than management's proposed "multiple times per week."

MLB is expected to make an economic proposal to the union within a few days. MLB hopes to start the season by early July.

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