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Download the Canada’s Smartest Person app

Jessi Cruickshank’s father has always thought he was an exceptionally intellectual person. Meanwhile, the host of Canada’s Smartest Person has waited for her chance to prove that she could outsmart her brainy dad. Now they have the tool to settle their friendly competition.

The Canada’s Smartest Person app launched Monday, giving Canadians a way to test their multiple intelligences and compare their smarts with their family, friends, partners, and the rest of the country.

Cruickshank says her father is looking forward to putting his skills to the test.

“My dad can’t understand why we are searching for Canada’s Smartest Person, because he genuinely believes he is Canada’s Smartest Person,” Cruickshank said. “He is determined to play along with the show and on the app and prove to me once and for all that he is god’s gift to intelligence.”

While watching Canada’s Smartest Person at home every Sunday, viewers can use the app to get a glimpse of what it’s like to be on the show. They’ll be able to take on the same brain-bending challenges in real time with the show’s 32 participants. There are also daily bonus challenges, which users can play to improve individual scores throughout the week.

Participants take on the "Moving Sum" challenge, while the screen on the left shows how the same challenge appears for viewers testing themselves on the app.

But the standout feature of the app is the personalized experience it gives viewers. Users get to build their own multiple intelligence profiles, simply by playing along. As you complete more challenges, the app shows how strong your skills are in the same six categories on which the show’s participants are tested: linguistic, physical, musical, visual, social, and logical.

Then the app takes that data a step further by generating a leaderboard and providing live results of how an individual’s score measures up against different genders and age groups across Canada.

When comparing herself to her father’s multliple intelligences, Cruickshank knows both their strengths and weaknesses.

“My dad is a strong logical thinker, I’ll give him that, and he does marathons and bike races and stuff. So, physically, even though I am 30 years younger than him and technically I should be stronger, he’ll probably win. Which is just sad for me,” Cruickshank said.

“However, I have an English degree from University of Toronto so if I don’t beat him in the linguistic category, I want my money back. I also feel good about my musical intelligence; I sing in the shower a lot.”

But the Canada’s Smartest Person app is not just for the competitive types, says Paul McGrath, CBC’s executive producer of interactive.

“The thing that I find is coolest [about the app] is it’s not like it’s a winner-and-loser app,” he said. “Everyone will take something away from this app, and everyone will learn something new about themselves and how they are smart.”

Cruickshank agrees, saying the show and the app offer a new perspective on the word ‘smart.’

“I am so excited for viewers to see the show because I really do think it will change the way we think about our own intelligence,” she said. “Skills you have that you may not have necessarily valued -- your ability to make friends at a party, your ability to write a letter or give a speech -- those things are reflections of your intelligence.

“Sure they may not influence your ‘IQ’ score but this show is setting out to prove that tests, scores, knowing your facts and figures -- they don’t matter anymore. It’s not about how smart you are, but how you are smart.”

But how does she think she’ll fare against her father when they take on the the challenges in the app?

“Secretly I cant wait to play against him and straight-up dominate,” Cruickshank said. “Dad, you’re going down.”

The app is now available on the App Store for iOS devices, and on the Google Play store for Android devices. You can also play online at cbc.ca/smartestperson.

Canada’s Smartest Person premieres Sunday, Sept. 28, at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT) on CBC.

Also on CBC