White Coat, Black Art·THE DOSE

Masks, social bubbles, lessons learned: How do I stay safe from COVID-19 now?

A lot of things have changed since our lives went into lockdown almost four months ago. Infectious disease specialist Dr. Allison McGeer returns this week with the latest reality check on everything from going to the hair salon to social bubbles as we try to navigate the new COVID-19 normal.
As many businesses reopen after months of lockdown, one of the most sought-after services is a return to the hair salon. On The Dose this week, infectious disease specialist Dr. Allison McGeer provides guidance on how to reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19 as much as possible in these and other settings. (Paul Smith/CBC)
Listen to the full episode22:34

A lot of things have changed since our lives went into lockdown almost four months ago. Almost every part of Canada is cautiously reopening businesses and services, people are starting to resume contact with a limited number of  family and friends through social bubbles or social circles — and the prevailing public health advice is to wear masks when we can't physically distance from others.

All of this can be confusing. Infectious disease specialist and medical microbiologist Dr. Allison McGeer, who has been helping The Dose listeners to navigate this pandemic since the beginning, returns this week with host Dr. Brian Goldman to provide insight into what we've learned so far — and the latest guidance on how to stay as safe as possible in this new COVID-19 normal.  

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