White Coat, Black Artwith Dr. Brian Goldman

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Laughing over spilled Jell-O: a radical prescription for loneliness in seniors

Why a 92-year-old woman now sees her roomate, 23, as a daughter.
DR. BRIAN'S BLOG

Mandatory added sugar labelling may benefit health

A study suggested that mandatory added sugar labelling for packaged foods may improve health and save lives.

Are mandatory vaccination orders the best way to fight measles outbreaks?

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio issued a mandatory vaccination policy in parts of Brooklyn this week, after nearly 300 measles infections were confirmed last fall. New York Times reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr says enforcing such an order will prove challenging.

Measles is making a comeback. So how did we get here?

In a bonus podcast you can stream here, the New York Times science reporter Donald G. McNeil talks to Dr. Brian Goldman about the newly-declared public health emergency in New York City, prompted by the measles outbreak in an Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. And he sheds light on the resurgence of the disease around the world.
DR. GOLDMAN'S BLOG

Early detection could avert the dangers of sepsis

When it comes to diagnosing life-threatening sepsis, minutes count. A new way to help doctors clue in to the deadly diagnosis could save lives.

'I didn't think I could have a baby': Toronto pregnancy clinic supports women with disabilities

Christine Lumilan, a mother with cerebral palsy, and Dr. Anne Berndl are breaking down barriers — medical and physical — to motherhood for disabled women. But they’re also challenging a culture which has been slow to accept the idea that disabled women can be mothers.
DR. GOLDMAN'S BLOG

Night time urination could mean your blood pressure's up

If you've been getting up to pee at night a bit more often lately, you might want to see your GP.

'You're weird, you're different and nobody wants to be your friend': the loneliness of FASD

White Coat, Black Art speaks with parents, educators and advocates who say fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, or FASD, gets less respect and fewer resources than almost any other developmental disability.
DR. GOLDMAN'S BLOG

The downside of 'one issue per visit' medicine

The policy of "one issue per visit" is impractical and could be putting some patients at risk.

Why a mom with cervical cancer needs women — and their doctors — to hear her story

Karla Van Kessel's doctor failed to recognize she had symptoms of cervical cancer and misread her Pap smear results, causing a dangerous delay in her diagnosis. She says women need to demand better screening tests and keep tabs on their medical records to avoid the same fate.
DR. BRIAN'S BLOG

The promise and the peril of Dr. Robot

How soon will robots pick up a stethoscope and start treating patients? Soon though not until some ethical kinks can be worked out.

How Alan Alda went from TV doctor to teaching real doctors about empathy

Dr. Goldman talks to Emmy Award-winning actor Alan Alda. While best known for his role on MASH, he's forged another career as an expert communicator, helping doctors relate better to patients. He also talks about his new podcast and his diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.
DR. BRIAN'S BLOG

What role do parents play in exposing children and teens to vaping?

When it comes to the growing ranks of teens who use e-cigarettes, a new U.S. study says some parents may be lax about vaping in the home or in the car.

Palliative care team helps the homeless die 'with dignity,' a healing circle helps them grieve

After a homeless woman died of breast cancer, the doctors, nurses and shelter workers who helped to ease her final days gathered to remember her.
DR. BRIAN'S BLOG

More support needed for unpaid caregivers in Canada

More than one in four Canadians provides unpaid care to family members and friends with chronic illnesses or disabilities. An editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal says all the work they do takes a toll on their finances and personal health.

'I'm alive because of it': Ostomy advocate fights to dispel stigmas around the procedure

A young boy in Kentucky took his own life in January, reportedly after being bullied, in part, because he had an ostomy bag. Now others who live with ostomies, including Uncover Ostomy founder Jessica Grossman, are fighting to dispel the stigma around those who have undergone this life-saving procedure.
DR. BRIAN'S BLOG

Long-term exclusive breastfeeding may have a downside

A new study suggests that the duration of breastfeeding and when solid foods are introduced could have an impact on the development of food allergies.

Part-time doctors defend their work: 'It doesn't make us any less valuable'

Not many doctors plan on working part-time. But more are choosing to do so. This week, Dr. Brian Goldman speaks with two part-time doctors who explain their choice.

How music helps rehab patients learn how to move again

Research has revealed that music therapy can improve motor skills in patients with neurological disorder.

All the drama of med school, live on stage

Why a New Jersey dermatologist decided to write a musical about med school ... and the show's journey to the off-Broadway stage.

The 7 most memorable medical moments in musical theatre

Where does Medicine the Musical fit into the cultural pantheon of singing doctors? We've rounded up seven of our favourite medical musical theatre moments.
DR. BRIAN'S BLOG

Teen girls on the pill may have long-term risk to bones

Teenage girls who take oral contraceptives may put themselves at risk of osteoporosis later in life.

Life with MS: Challenges, losses, but also purpose and 'deep joy'

Elizabeth Rathbun is one of more than 77,000 Canadians who live with multiple sclerosis. She shares her 30-year journey with the disease and offers insight into what it's like to live with MS and the health-care system.
DR. BRIAN'S BLOG

'No blanket approval' to use personal health data in research, focus groups say

A new survey from ICES in Ontario says the public approves of the use of personal health data for research. But that support has limits.

Learning from loss: Her brother's death changed how this doctor treats patients

When Vivian Tam’s older brother was diagnosed with cancer, she wanted to be his person. Despite accompanying him to medical appointments and staying by his side in the hospital, the young medical student found she was actually quite helpless.

Laughing over spilled Jell-O: a radical prescription for loneliness in seniors

Why a 92-year-old woman now sees her roomate, 23, as a daughter.

How Alan Alda went from TV doctor to teaching real doctors about empathy

Dr. Goldman talks to Emmy Award-winning actor Alan Alda. While best known for his role on MASH, he's forged another career as an expert communicator, helping doctors relate better to patients. He also talks about his new podcast and his diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.