Unreserved

Winter reading list: Indigenous authors share their favourite reads of 2020

The holidays are right around the corner, and it’s no better time — or year, frankly — to curl up with a great book by an Indigenous author.
This week, we visit with a few Indigenous authors about their work and what they're reading, just in time for the holiday season. From left: Waubgeshig Rice, Brianna Jonnie, Darcie Little Badger, Michelle Good. (Yvon Theriault/CBC, CBC, Submitted by Darcie Little Badger, Kent Wong)

The holidays are right around the corner, and it's no better time — or year, frankly — to curl up with a great book by an Indigenous author.

This week on Unreserved, we're creating your holiday book list.

Anishinaabe author Waubgeshig Rice is about as well-suited to recommend books as anyone. As a jury member for this year's Writers' Trust Awards, he had to read 123 books by Canadian authors in seven months. He shares some of his favourites of the year.

One of the books Rice recommends is Michelle Good's Five Little Indians, a fictional tale that follows the lives of five residential school survivors. It took Good more than nine years to write the book — and she says it all paid off.

Brianna Jonnie was 14 when she wrote a letter to the City of Winnipeg asking them to take MMIW more seriously. Four years later, she's released a graphic novel inspired by the letter called, If I Go Missing. 

Darcie Little Badger released her first novel, Elastoe, in August. It's already been named to Time's list of Best Fantasy Books of All Time. The Lipan Apache author talks about her young adult book and what it means to write about Indigenous people in the future.
 

This week's playlist:
Trixie Mattel. (Lisa Predko)

nêhiyawak — open window

Trixie Mattel — Video Games

N'we Jinan — The Highway

 

now