Unreserved

Unreserved: Radio Indigenous on CBC Radio One, August 30

Unreserved is the radio space for community, culture and conversation. Host Rosanna Deerchild takes you straight into Indigenous Canada to meet storytellers, culture makers and community shakers.
Unreserved host Rosanna Deerchild takes you straight into Indigenous Canada to meet storytellers, culture-makers and community shakers. (CBC)

Tansi, aniin, booshoo and hello. Welcome to a new national voice for Indigenous Peoples.

Unreserved is the radio space for community, culture and conversation. Host Rosanna Deerchild takes you straight into Indigenous Canada to meet storytellers, culture makers and community shakers.

This week on Unreserved:

To vote or not to vote? That is the question. 
Winnipeg's Indigenous Rock the Vote campaign aims to get First Nations people out to vote in the federal election. (Ryan Cheale/CBC)

Indigenous Peoples have a bumpy voting history in Canada. Laws allowing the vote for Status Indians and Inuit were complicated and inconsistent; culturally speaking, the "majority rules" concept was contrary to many nations rooted in consensus or matrilineal ways of choosing leadership. Even after we were allowed the vote in 1960, poll turn-out has always been low.

But that is changing, as more Indigenous people become politically aware and involved. A grassroots movement in Winnipeg, called Indigenous Rock the Vote, inspired a record number of people to head to the polls in the last civic election. Organizer Sylvia Boudreau talks to Rosanna about how she hopes to repeat the feat for the federal election.

Is hip-hop the new Indigenous storytelling? 

Lindsay Knight is from Muskoday First Nation in Saskatchewan, but she is better known as Eekwol. This Plains Cree woman first hit the hip-hop scene back in 1999 with her debut EP. She just released her fifth album, Good Kill, this summer after a six-year-long hiatus. Her lyrics are hard-hitting political anthems, educational sound bites and cultural love songs.

Daniella Zalcman photographed Grant Severight, who went to St. Phillips Indian Residential School in Kamsack, Saskatchewan. (Daniella Zalcman/Pulitzer Center)
A picture worth a thousand words.

American journalist Daniella Zalcman spent three weeks in Saskatchewan, capturing the experiences of residential school survivors in pictures. She wanted to do more than just simple portraits.

Grant Severeight was sent to the Phillips Indian Residential School in Kamsack between 1955 and 1964. He feels proud when he looks at the black-and-white photograph taken by Zalcman. It reminds him of how far he's come.

Logan Staats
This week's playlist:

Digging Roots - For the Light

Eekwol - I Will Not be Conquered 

Buffy Sainte-Marie - Starwalker

Logan Staats - What You Love

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