Unreserved

Tradition, authenticity and the fight for indigenous identity

From the fight to get traditional names recognized by government and social networking sites, to who has the right to tell indigenous story, we're looking at what 'authentic' really means.

Tradition, authenticity and the fight for indigenous identity

Twendolyn Napsiq wears her traditional Inuktitut clothing as she walks up the stairs to the Nakasuk Elementary School in Iqaluit, Nunavut. (CP/Nathan Denette)

From the fight to get traditional names recognized by government and social networking sites, to who has the right to tell indigenous story, we're looking at what 'authentic' really means. 

While Justin Trudeau has promised an inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women, volunteers in Winnipeg continue to search that city's Red River with hooks looking for the disappeared. Rosanna Deerchild heads out on a boat with Drag the Red volunteers to see firsthand what they're pulling out of the muddy waters.  

Political science professor Adam Jones wonders why missing and murdered indigenous men and boys don't warrant a hashtag... or even very much interest from the public. 

IsKwé, whose traditional Cree name is Wasekwan Iskwew, was told by Facebook that the service requires users to go by their "authentic name". Hear what happened when she pushed back.

Shene Catholique-Valpy has been trying to get her daughter's name on an official birth certificate for almost two years. The problem is that the glottal stop in Sahaiʔa's name isn't recognized by the government. 

Khelsilem wasn't born with a traditional name, but when his grandmother decided he was ready to carry it, he had to decide how to integrate it into his life. 

And celebrated author Joseph Boyden talks inspiration and who has the right to share indigenous story.  
 

Wolf Saga (Wolf Saga/Facebook)
This week's playlist
IsKwé - Nobody Knows
Leela Gilday - I Feel Stronger
Wolf Saga - All In 

now