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Standing Rock protectors gather in North Dakota to stop pipeline

It is being called the largest protest by Indigenous Nations in recent history. For weeks, thousands of people from nearly 300 nations have been gathering in the southern part of North Dakota. They've come to stand with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The Sioux are trying to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Red Warrior Camp in southern North Dakota, set up to support the Standing Rock Sioux Nation's fight against an oil pipeline, has swelled as thousands show up in support. (Trevor Brine/CBC)
It is being called the largest protest by Indigenous Nations in recent history. For weeks, thousands of people from nearly 300 nations have been gathering in the southern part of North Dakota.

They've come to stand with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The Sioux are trying to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The pipeline passes right by the reservation and tribal members say if that pipeline breaks, it would be an environmental disaster.

CBC's Tim Fontaine recently traveled to Standing Rock. Click the LISTEN button above to hear him share stories of some of the people he met.
"Any act of violence hurts our cause and is not welcome here," said Standing Rock Sioux Tribe chair David Archambault as North Dakota's governor activates the National Guard. (Trevor Brine/CBC)

"When you're driven by money and when you're driven by greed, the water, the environment and the Indigenous peoples and Indigenous lands — those things don't matter to them." — David Archambault, chair of Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council
"Tell the pipeline, the veterans are here," said J.R. American Horse, one of thousands who have gathered in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. (Tim Fontaine/CBC)

"My hope in being here is to see the unity. And I'm hoping that our tribes now can see how strong we can be as a people if we band together.' — Diane Hart, member of the Bishop Paiute Nation in California
Diane Hart travelled from Bishop, California, bringing her two granddaughters to see the camp on the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation. (Trevor Brine/CBC)

"It's overwhelming. It's something else. I never expected it to be this big, but I'm thankful and I'm proud to be Native American because I know with unity there is a lot of things we could overcome."  — David Archambault 
Haida opponents of an American oil pipeline march in North Dakota. ( Erica Ryan-Gagne/Facebook)

"Our mother told us in the early '90s ... as a grandmother she asked us not to have any more children unless we could guarantee that our children were going to have a future that was clean, that they would be healthy." — Katherine Whitecloud from La Salle, Man., former chief of the Sioux Valley First Nation

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