Unreserved

Reclaiming space through cooking, tattoos and satire

From tattooing, to satire, to cooking - this week on Unreserved we look at the many ways Indigenous people are reclaiming their culture.
Tanya Sayer taught herself to sew so she could make her own ribbon skirts for ceremony. (Nichole Huck/CBC )
Listen to the full episode39:24

From tattooing, to satire, to cooking — this week on Unreserved we look at the many ways Indigenous people are reclaiming their culture. 

Four months ago Tim Fontaine was a serious journalist, but he decided to set his journalism career on fire with a new satire website, Walking Eagle News.

Chef Sean Sherman's new book The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen dispels the myth that Indigenous food is fry bread and Indian tacos, and instead offers recipes made with foods Indigenous to North America. 

Reporters in New Zealand are getting hate mail for occasionally using Maori words in their broadcasts. This prompted Kanoa Lloyd, a New Zealand host for Newshub, to take a stand.

Nakkita Trimble is reclaiming her Nisga'a heritage one tattoo at a time, and learned her craft from some of the best traditional Tomoko tattooists in New Zealand. 

A few years ago Tanya Sayer turned to her Indigenous spirituality to help her recover from an addiction to drugs. From this, Spirit Wear was born — an company that makes ribbon skirts and shirts for use in ceremony.