Unreserved

How Indigenous authors are claiming space in the CanLit scene

Pushing past the margins, Indigenous authors are making space for their voices and stories. This week on Unreserved, what is Indigenous literature, and is it part of the larger CanLit scene?
What is Indigenous literature, and is it part of the larger CanLit scene? (Wilfrid Laurier University Press/open-book.ca/Brush Education Inc.)
Listen to the full episode46:43

Pushing past the margins, Indigenous authors are making space for their voices and stories. This week on Unreserved, what is Indigenous literature, and is it part of the larger CanLit scene? 

In his essay, "What Do the Allegations Against Sherman Alexie Mean for Native Literature?," Theodore Van Alst says that the canon of Native American literature in the U.S. needs to expand to include more voices. 

Tuscarora writer and editor Alicia Elliott calls out the CanLit scene for their lack of diversity in her column, "CanLit is a Raging Dumpster Fire." But after being left out of a panel inspired by her column, Elliott says the CanLit scene is still falling short. 

In his new book, Why Indigenous Literatures Matter, Daniel Heath Justice both defines Indigenous literatures and makes a case for why it is important. 

Gregory Younging was working as the editor when he started noticing problems popping up in Indigenous literature, prompting him to write a style guide, Elements of Indigenous Style

Lee Maracle is one of the most established and respected Indigenous writers in Canada, but there was a time when her voice and stories were not recognized in the CanLit scene. 

This Week's Playlist 
Beatrice Deer (Submitted)

Kinnie Starr - Gotta Do Something

Beatrice Deer - You're With Me