Unreserved

Greetings from Iqaluit: Exploring the strength of Inuit culture

This week, Unreserved is on the ground in Iqaluit, Nunavut, celebrating the 20th anniversary of Nunavut officially becoming Canada's third territory. From music and art, to food and language, we'll find out what has kept the Inuit culture thriving. 
Unreserved's adventures in Iqaluit included a visit to Apex Beach, eating maktaaq (or narwhal), visiting with some jewelry makers, speaking with elders and finding a stash of fur hats to wear. (Kyle Muzyka/CBC)
Listen to the full episode46:15

This week, Unreserved is on the ground in Iqaluit, Nunavut, celebrating the 20th anniversary of Nunavut officially becoming Canada's third territory. 

From music and art, to food and language, we'll find out what has kept the Inuit culture thriving.

When teacher Elizabeth Ryan, heard kids throat singing during recess at Nakasuk Elementary School, she decided to start a club to help them develop their talents. Rosanna will meet two 10-year-old throat singers and get them to teach her a few notes. 

Mathew Nuqingaq is a celebrated silversmith, whose snow goggles have been worn by Prince Charles. He'll show Rosanna around Aayuraa Studio and talk about how jewelry can hold and share stories.  

We'll drop in on CBC Iqaluit to find out how TV host Madeleine Allakariallak translates the news into Inuktitut live on-air every night.

The Qajuqturvik Food Centreis in the heart of Iqaluit. The name of centre translates to "place to get soup". But people don't just come here to share a meal.

A documentary called Playing Through Blizzards highlights the importance of soccer in the north. The game is a great way for Inuit to keep busy and active. But as our Kyle Muzyka found out, for Inuit, soccer is more than just the Beautiful Game.

This week's playlist
Northern Haze (Josh Qaumariaq )

Leetia Kalluk - Maanna

Northern Haze - Puigo

Josh Q and the Trade-Offs - Dancing With the Wind