Unreserved

Art in Iqaluit: How creativity fosters healing

Whether it's music, movies, television or art, Inuit are sharing their triumphs, talents and humour — and they're using it to shed light on some dark realities.
Art in Iqaluit is thriving, with productions like "The Grizzlies" (top-left), "Qanurli" (bottom-left) and art from Inuit artists like Goota Ashoona. (soda studios, Qanurli, Kyle Muzyka/CBC)

Whether it's music, movies, television or art, Inuit are sharing their triumphs, talents and humour — and they're using it to shed light on some dark realities.

This week on Unreserved, we look at how Inuit are using art to foster healing.

The Grizzlies, a film based on an unlikely lacrosse team from Kugluktuk, is almost an exact retelling of a real story. Actor Anna Lambe talks about why the story, full of tragedy, hardships and reality, was an important one to tell.

Inuk rapper FXCKMR is frank when he discusses suicide in his music — we hear about why covering difficult topics in music can help save lives.

Artists can also show the lighter side, too — we speak to Vinnie Karetak, the host of APTN's Qanurli, a show that he describes as "a combination of This Hour has 22 Minutes and Saturday Night Live".

The Winnipeg Art Gallery is building a new Inuit Art Centre — one that will take the thousands of Inuit pieces out of their underground vault and put them into an above-ground, clear display for visitors to enjoy. Rosanna takes a look at the construction site before heading into the vault to take a look at the collection.

This week's playlist: 

FXCKMR. (Andrew Alba/CBC)

Tanya Tagaq — Icebreaker
FXCKMR — Life N Death
Riit — Quamajuapik

 

 

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