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Are we in the midst of a 'new Native Renaissance'?

In a recent article for The Paris Review, Julian Brave NoiseCat described the New Native Renaissance he says the literary world is experiencing right now. We'll talk to NoiseCat about what that means, and find out which writers are leading the charge.
Billy-Ray Belcourt, Tommy Orange and Terese Marie Mailhot are a few of the authors leading the new Native renaissance in literature. (Frontenac House/Knopf Doubleday/Doubleday Canada)

In a recent article for The Paris ReviewJulian Brave NoiseCat described the New Native Renaissance he says the literary world is experiencing right now. We'll talk to NoiseCat about what that means, and find out which writers are leading the charge. 

When Billy-Ray Belcourt went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, he'd never written poetry. But racist experiences and feeling "unbodied" while studying overseas inspired his Griffin prize winning book, This Wound Is a World

Terese Marie Mailhot's debut book, Heart Berries: A Memoir, is a New York Times bestseller and has been nominated for the 2018 Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction. She'll talk to Rosanna about how writing about her own childhood abuse and time in a institution opened up a dialogue in her relationship and family.

Tommy Orange, author of There, There, is another rising star in the New Native Renaissance. He sat down with Rosanna in front of an audience at McNally Robinson Books in Winnipeg to discuss his approach to writing.

This week's Playlist
Jeremy Dutcher won the 2018 Polaris Music Prize (Dustin Rabin)

Jeremy Dutcher - Nipuwoltin
nêhiyawak - Page

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