Unreserved

An entrepreneur, a fire chief and budding journalists: Meet Indigenous youth doing amazing things

Starting a jingle cone business, learning about Inuit politics and history, and a youth who became his community's fire chief — this week on Unreserved, Indigenous youth doing amazing things.
Abby Alexis is a Grade 11 student at Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation school west of Edmonton. (Meagan Fiddler/CBC)

Starting a jingle cone business, learning about Inuit politics and history, and a youth who became his community's fire chief — this week on Unreserved, Indigenous youth doing amazing things. 

Seventeen year old Émilie McKinney from Swan Lake First Nation has hoop danced around the world, but now she can add entrepreneur to her resume. She started Anishinaabe Bimishimo Corporation, a company that makes jingle cones and lids for jingle dresses.

Teen Vogue contributor Ruth Hopkins, a Dakota/Lakota Sioux writer, says youth are hungry for political writing and Teen Vogue is filling the gap.  

Rosanna heads to Nunavut Sivuniksavut, an Ottawa hub for post-secondary Inuit students from across Nunavut to learn about Inuit politics, history and culture. Melissa Irwin, who is an alum from the program, now teaches contemporary Inuit issues.

High school students from Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation near Edmonton are being mentored by CBC employees. The hope is they'll get enough experience to earn a by-line with a story they have written, recorded or photographed about their own community. Unreserved's Meagan Fiddler is one of the mentors and she'll share her experiences working with the youth.

Kashechewan First Nation is no stranger to flood evacuations. Brandon Spence remembers going through precautionary evacuations every year. Now, as the community's 22-year-old fire chief, he's helping them through the tricky transition. 
 

This Week's Playlist: 
Cody Coyote. (Marc-André Cossette/CBC)

N'we Jinan - Growing Young 

Cody Coyote - Can You Hear Me Now? 

Twin Flames - Oak Tree

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