Unreservedwith Rosanna Deerchild

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First Words: Bruce Starlight speaks Tsuut'ina

In this episode of First Words, Bruce Starlight explains why there are only 29 speakers of Tsuut'ina left and teaches you a short, conversational way to greet someone.

Giant Indigenous Peoples Atlas floor map will change the way you see Canada

A giant floor map, and the accompanying Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada are changing the way kids — and adults — look at Canada. It was created by National Geographic.

'I regret it': Hayden King on writing Ryerson University's territorial acknowledgement

There's growing tension about the politics of territorial acknowledgements. Hayden King, an Anishinaabe writer and educator, spoke to Unreserved host Rosanna Deerchild about what they mean in today's political climate, and how they can be improved. Here's part of that conversation.

Want to learn whose Indigenous land you're on? There's an app for that

If you want to find out whose land you're on, and learn more about how to acknowledge it. There's an app for that. Mitch Holmes is Haudenosaunee, and he's one of the developers of Whose Land, an app and website that can help you find out whose territory you're on.

How one cartographer is helping Indigenous communities put themselves on the map

When most people look at a digital map, one of the first things they zoom in on is their home. But for many Indigenous people from remote areas, their homes and communities weren't on Google Maps and Google Earth. Steve DeRoy, an Anishinaabe/Saulteaux cartographer, helped change that.

Mapping MMIWG: Cartographer calls workshops a healing tool for communities

An Indigenous cartographer is using mapping as a way to tell the stories of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. So far, Annita Lucchesi has helped document over 3,000 cases, some reaching as far back as 1900.

Redrawing the Lines

Maps have long been called a tool of colonization. They've carved out pieces of Indigenous land and replaced them with neat lines of provinces and territories. But Indigenous cartographers are drawing back their places and names, using mapmaking to tell us the true stories of what we now call Canada.

First Words: Cameron Adams speaks Swampy Cree

In this episode of First Words, Cameron Adams explains how living with an acquired brain injury makes learning Swampy Cree even more challenging. He'll also teach you a bunch of words including kisâkihitin, which means I love you, and how to say hello and bugs.

Woman in iconic anti-fracking photo calls it a 'middle finger' to the industry

When Amanda Polchies decided to go to an anti-fracking protest near Rexton, N.B., in 2013, she didn't expect to become the subject of an image that would be seen around the world.

Take more selfies! Curator wants Indigenous people to flood social media with their photos

Romanticized, objectified, sexualized, are some of the words that come to mind for Dr. Sherry Farrell Racette when she thinks about how Indigenous women were portrayed in early photographs. But, when Indigenous women got behind the camera they started resisting these representations.

Iconic Indigenous imagery: How photos shape movements and connect us to history

Single iconic images can represent an entire movement. Whether it's a celebration of the end of a war, to remember resistance, or even a photograph of a famous beauty queen over a subway vent, a picture can often be worth more than 1,000 words.

Shooting past stereotypes: Photojournalist challenges expectations with contemporary images

When Tailyr Irvine was growing up on the Flathead Reservation in Ronan, Montana, she saw the images local media used to cover the Salish and Kootenai Tribes as being stereotypical.

No beads, no feathers: Historical photos show strength, humour of Indigenous communities

Three years ago, Paul Seesequasis began sharing historical photos of Indigenous people on Twitter and Facebook. The black and white photos were taken between 1920-1970, and are of Indigenous people wearing contemporary clothing doing everyday things.

One photograph shaped how everyone saw the Oka Crisis

One particular photograph captured the moment that went on to represent the entire siege at Kanesatake. Freelance photographer Shaney Komulainen was the woman behind the lens of that iconic image.

First Words: Russell Fayant speaks Michif

In this episode of First Words, Russell Fayant explains why so few people speak the Michif language. He'll teach you the word for partner, how to say to laugh and a phrase that means reconciliation.

Life after a brain injury: Kinnie Starr on trauma, loss and finding her way back through music

In 2015, everything changed for musician Kinnie Starr. A car accident left her with a severe brain injury, which makes it difficult for her to play music.

First Words: Richard Van Camp speaks Tlicho

In this episode of First Words, writer and storyteller Richard Van Camp explains the meaning behind his son Edzazii's name. He'll also teach you to say bear, rabbit and ask someone 'Would you like some tea?' in Tlicho.

'I'd never written about my abuse as truth, I'd always fictionalized it': Terese Marie Mailhot on her memoir

When Terese Marie Mailhot published her debut memoir, Heart Berries, she couldn’t have predicted the response. It was met with rave reviews, and quickly became a New York Times bestseller.

Voices from the past: Musician Jeremy Dutcher gives new life to wax cylinder recordings of his ancestors

Jeremy Dutcher’s new album reaches across generations to a nearly forgotten history and brings ancestral voices back to life. Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa, or Our Maliseets Songs, started as a seed planted by one of his elders more than five years ago.

Telling stories and driving change: Tantoo Cardinal on the long, slow evolution of Hollywood

With almost 100 big and small screen credits on her reel, Tantoo Cardinal is a matriarch of the silver screen. This year she had three films showing at the Toronto International Film Festival, Falls Around Her, The Grizzlies and Through Black Spruce.

Racist experiences prompted Billy-Ray Belcourt to write poetry, then he won the Griffin Poetry Prize

When Billy-Ray Belcourt went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, he'd written a bit of poetry, but racist experiences and feeling "unbodied" while studying overseas inspired his Griffin Prize-winning book, This Wound Is a World.

Class of 2018: Writing bestsellers and making breakthroughs

As we bid farewell to 2018, it seemed like the perfect time to look back and listen to those who won awards and accolades, became bestsellers and made breakthroughs. This week on Unreserved, meet the class of 2018.

#BuyNative movement pushes product for Indigenous creators

The hashtag is meant to bring attention to Indigenous creators in hopes more people support them. Clothing, art, jewellery and food products are being showcased by artisans and their supporters. And it's having an impact.

Unreserved shares the holiday spirit from across Turtle Island

While we're all joyfully baking, gifting and celebrating we thought we'd share some holiday spirit love from across Turtle Island. This week on Unreserved, feeding the heart, mind and body with kindness, art and wisdom.

2018 CBC Thunder Bay Sounds of the Season has taken flight across northwestern Ontario

The planes are in the air, and CBC Thunder Bay's 2018 Sounds of the Season fundraiser is underway.

'I'd never written about my abuse as truth, I'd always fictionalized it': Terese Marie Mailhot on her memoir

When Terese Marie Mailhot published her debut memoir, Heart Berries, she couldn’t have predicted the response. It was met with rave reviews, and quickly became a New York Times bestseller.

Racist experiences prompted Billy-Ray Belcourt to write poetry, then he won the Griffin Poetry Prize

When Billy-Ray Belcourt went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, he'd written a bit of poetry, but racist experiences and feeling "unbodied" while studying overseas inspired his Griffin Prize-winning book, This Wound Is a World.

Telling stories and driving change: Tantoo Cardinal on the long, slow evolution of Hollywood

With almost 100 big and small screen credits on her reel, Tantoo Cardinal is a matriarch of the silver screen. This year she had three films showing at the Toronto International Film Festival, Falls Around Her, The Grizzlies and Through Black Spruce.