Unreservedwith Rosanna Deerchild

Latest

'Building their own community around writing': the new Native Renaissance in literature

In an article for The Paris Review, Tsq'escen journalist Julian Brave NoiseCat says that we’re entering a new Native Renaissance.

'I'd never written about my abuse as truth, I'd always fictionalized it': Terese Marie Mailhot on her memoir

When Terese Marie Mailhot published her debut memoir, Heart Berries, she couldn’t have predicted the response. It was met with rave reviews, and quickly became a New York Times bestseller.

Racist experiences prompted Billy-Ray Belcourt to write poetry, then he won the Griffin Poetry Prize

When Billy-Ray Belcourt went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, he'd written a bit of poetry, but racist experiences and feeling "unbodied" while studying overseas inspired his Griffin Prize-winning book, This Wound Is a World.

'I grew up knowing what I was, was a conflict': Tommy Orange writes about challenges facing 'urban Indians'

In his debut novel, Tommy Orange reveals a world not often explored, the lives of "urban Indians." There, There is set in Oakland, California and is told from the perspective of multiple characters in short episodic chapters. Ultimately, the connections between the characters are revealed when they converge at the Big Oakland Powwow.

Are we in the midst of a 'new Native Renaissance'?

In a recent article for The Paris Review, Julian Brave NoiseCat described the New Native Renaissance he says the literary world is experiencing right now. We'll talk to NoiseCat about what that means, and find out which writers are leading the charge.

The new era of Indigenous cinema: Unreserved heads to TIFF

The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) is arguably one of the largest and most prestigious film festivals in the world, and it's wrapping up this week. The festival attracts big celebrities and hosts the premieres of some of the year's most anticipated films. But is it also ushering in a new era for Indigenous film?

Telling stories and driving change: Tantoo Cardinal on the long, slow evolution of Hollywood

With almost 100 big and small screen credits on her reel, Tantoo Cardinal is a matriarch of the silver screen. This year she had three films showing at the Toronto International Film Festival, Falls Around Her, The Grizzlies and Through Black Spruce.

From controversy swirling around Through Black Spruce to hearing Haida on film: TIFF insights from Jesse Wente

Jesse Wente is a film buff, with a specialty in Indigenous film. With more than 20 years of experience in the industry, he shared his insights into the Indigenous films screening at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

First feature film shot in Haida premieres at TIFF

Sgaaway K'uuna (Edge of the Knife) is the first feature film made entirely in the Haida language, a language spoken fluently by 24 people. The film premiered at TIFF, but Haida co-director Gwaai Edenshaw said, “we made the movie for our people.”

Kick up your moccasins: Unreserved visits the Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation powwow

What a better way to kick off the new season of Unreserved, than by kicking up our moccasins and dancing? This week we’re meeting at the Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation powwow.

'The arbour saved my life,' says powwow dancer who survived brain tumour

In 2006, Wallace Moar Jr. from Crane River, Man. found out he had a brain tumour. That diagnosis led him to powwow dancing.

PHOTOS: Unreserved at the Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation powwow

Unreserved visited the Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation, which is over 170 km northwest of Winnipeg, for their 37th Annual Traditional Powwow.

Drop the mic: Rosanna Deerchild fulfills lifelong dream as powwow emcee

At every powwow there is a person at the centre of it all, the glue holding the whole thing together, that knows all, sees all and tells all. That person is the emcee. At the Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation powwow, that person was Michael Esquash from Swan Lake First Nation.

Powwow dancer thanks stranger who returned lost regalia

A First Nation powwow dancer returned to Portage la Prairie, Man., this week to personally thank the man who returned his lost regalia.

Kamloops man says powwow dancing saved his life

Battling alcoholism and a traumatic past, Denny Thomas from Kamloops Indian Band says powwow dancing helped him turn his life around.

'I've come a long way': Beatrice Deer on moving past addiction, anxiety and anger

Writing her latest album, My All to You, was an emotional experience for Beatrice Deer. "I remember feeling that verbal expression is very limited but music is like 1,000 words coming out all at once and you're not even talking," Deer said.

'It tells a truth that has been kept secret': Children of God brings residential school story to the stage

A modern musical that sheds light on the painful experience of residential schools has broken new ground in Indigenous Canadian theatre. Children of God was eight years in the making, and is the passion piece of Oji-Cree playwright and composer Corey Payette.

Illustrating colonization: Painting the link between history and poor health outcomes for Indigenous patients

The images and colours are vivid. Bright greens, blues and pinks are contrasted against a black background. The artist, Lisa Boivin, is a member of the Deninu K'ue First Nation, N.W.T. She is also a PhD student studying rehabilitation science at the faculty of medicine at the University of Toronto.

Indigenous artists explore the link between creativity and healing

Whether through painting, theatre, or music, Indigenous artists are exploring the link between creativity and healing.

Perpetuating stereotypes: Nursing student calls out racism in academia

Danielle Bourque, an Indigenous student originally from Beaver Lake Cree Nation, Alta., is now completing a masters degree in nursing at McMaster University. She said throughout her years as a student, she's often been singled out for her First Nation identity, with experiences ranging from overt to subtle racism all within an academic setting.

'Universities don't become different just by wishing for it': Eve Tuck on the challenge of changing academia

For Eve Tuck, Indigenization in post-secondary institutions is less about what words or mandates universities adopt, and more about who and how they are hire. "Universities don't become different just by wishing for it or by saying this is our new mandate," said Tuck, an Associate Professor of Critical Race and Indigenous Studies at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

The politics of citation: Is the peer review process biased against Indigenous academics?

"Publish or perish" is a phrase often used to describe the constant pressure academics face to publish their work. Having a healthy publishing record can have a real impact on job prospects, research grants and fellowships. But for Indigenous academics whose work focuses on Indigenous issues, the peer review process can be difficult to go through.

Colonized classrooms: Student experiences 'embedded in racism'

There are many stories of racism in academia. Sheila Cote-Meek knows this both from her many years as a student and through her PhD research. "We always talk about racism as existing in society," said Cote-Meek, Associate Vice-President of Academic and Indigenous Programs at Laurentian University.

Decolonizing the classroom: Is there space for Indigenous knowledge in academia?

"Education is what got us into this mess … but education is the key to reconciliation," said Senator Murray Sinclair, who led the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. This week on Unreserved, three years after the release of the TRC's final report, is there space for Indigenous knowledge in academia?

Community involvement a requirement for Indigenizing academia

Mark Solomon leads the Indigenization efforts at Seneca College in Toronto. He sees a few challenges but also some successes in academia's efforts to catch up with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action around education. But even saying the word "Indigenization" makes Solomon uncomfortable.

Illustrating colonization: Painting the link between history and poor health outcomes for Indigenous patients

The images and colours are vivid. Bright greens, blues and pinks are contrasted against a black background. The artist, Lisa Boivin, is a member of the Deninu K'ue First Nation, N.W.T. She is also a PhD student studying rehabilitation science at the faculty of medicine at the University of Toronto.

'It tells a truth that has been kept secret': Children of God brings residential school story to the stage

A modern musical that sheds light on the painful experience of residential schools has broken new ground in Indigenous Canadian theatre. Children of God was eight years in the making, and is the passion piece of Oji-Cree playwright and composer Corey Payette.

'I've come a long way': Beatrice Deer on moving past addiction, anxiety and anger

Writing her latest album, My All to You, was an emotional experience for Beatrice Deer. "I remember feeling that verbal expression is very limited but music is like 1,000 words coming out all at once and you're not even talking," Deer said.

Indigenous artists explore the link between creativity and healing

Whether through painting, theatre, or music, Indigenous artists are exploring the link between creativity and healing.