SATIRE

Canadian airports to add free medical checkups to security screenings

In an effort to better serve travelers passing through Canadian airports, the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority will be offering free medical information with every security screening.
Transportation Security Administration officers. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Listen3:26

In an effort to better serve travelers passing through Canadian airports, the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority will be offering free medical information with every security screening.

"I don't think that the general public realizes just how powerful these scanners are," says Donald Champagne, a spokesperson for the Canadian TSA. "Yes we can see what's in a passenger's pocket, but we can also see so much more."

TSA agents at Canadian airports grew frustrated with their inability to offer free, discreet medical information to passengers so a pilot project was launched last year to detect the feasibility of the new initiative.

"I can't tell you the number of times a passenger has stepped through a scanner and I've seen something very unsettling that I want to bring to their attention," Champagne says.

Examples include slipped discs, bone spurs, blocked bowels, and abnormal growths on buttocks. According to Champagne, the TSA agents see it all.

"We feel we have a responsibility here to let these passengers know if we see something that we feel requires medical attention," he says.

Listen to the full story to find out about the successes the pilot project has had so far.  

Thanks to listener Iain Macleod for getting us to look into this idea.


This Is That is an award-winning satirical radio program that doesn't just talk about the issues, it fabricates them. Each week, hosts Pat Kelly and Peter Oldring introduce you to the voices and stories that give this country character in this 100% improvised send-up of public radio.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.