This is That·SATIRE

Canada wants to create its own royal family

Although Canada has famous families like the Gretzkys, the Molsons, and the Mansbridges, no Canadian family has yet been designated as royalty. But that might be about to change.
Queen Elizabeth and co. (Stefan Wermuth/Reuters)
Listen3:57

Although Canada has famous families like the Gretzkys, the Molsons, and the Mansbridges, no Canadian family has yet been designated as royalty. But that might be about to change.

The Klanberg family of Red Deer, Alberta is petitioning the government of Canada to have their family recognized as this country's monarchs. Ron Klanberg, the family's patriarch, joins host Peter Oldring to explain why Canada needs a royal family.

"We're one of the world's most important countries right now," Ron says. "If you look around, the world's kind of looking to us for answers."

For too long, he says, we've looked towards Great Britain and their royal family. In order to affirm its position on the world stage, Ron believes that Canada needs to instill its own monarchy and he's putting his family forward for the job.

When asked why his family should become Canada's monarchy, Ron opened up the discussion to challenge.

"This is just the start of the conversation," he says. "If you think your fancy family from downtown Toronto has what it takes to be the royal family, bring it on."

Listen to the full story to find out who will be crowned Canada's first monarch.

Thanks to listener Joanna Munholland on Twitter for getting us to look into this idea.


This Is That is an award-winning satirical radio program that doesn't just talk about the issues, it fabricates them. Each week, hosts Pat Kelly and Peter Oldring introduce you to the voices and stories that give this country character in this 100% improvised send-up of public radio.

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