This is That

Disgraced stay-at-home dad had been working the whole time

After giving birth to their twin boys, Tyler Lewis respected his wife’s decision to return to work. He assumed the responsibilities of a stay-at-home dad and thrived in his new identity, even becoming president of the Stay-at-Home Dad Association of Hamilton, Ontario.
Young sad mad standing by the window looking outside (Getty Images/iStockphoto)
Listen6:32

After giving birth to their twin boys, Tyler Lewis respected his wife Shannon's decision to return to work. He assumed the responsibilities of a stay-at-home dad and thrived in his new identity, even becoming president of the Stay-at-Home Dad Association of Hamilton, ON.  

On the surface, everything seemed perfect. But Shannon soon found out that Tyler was living a double-life. He was secretly travelling to work each day and had hired a nanny to care for their young children.

"I knew I was making a mistake, but I didn't have the courage to tell my wife. So I went online and found a nanny," Tyler told This Is That.

His web of lies began to unwind when Tyler was unable to put his children on the phone when Shannon called from work. "I'd have to pretend that they were napping," Tyler said.

As the lies became increasingly elaborate, Shannon began to suspect that something was wrong. Initially, she believed that Tyler was having an affair.

"She hired somebody to follow me," said Tyler. Confronted with an envelope full of photographs proving he wasn't staying at home to be a dad, Tyler eventually confessed to being gainfully employed and to having hired a nanny.

"She was devastated," said Tyler. Shannon has since ended the marriage.

Members of the Stay-at-Home Dad Association were equally upset. "Being a stay-at-home dad means that you're part of a brotherhood. You'll do anything for those guys. And I betrayed them and I betrayed their trust," said Tyler.

Listen to the full story to find out how Tyler's fell from grace by entering the workforce.

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