This is That

First there was the driverless car, now there is a riderless bike

The driverless car is heralded as the transportation method of the future but many critics say there are more efficient ways to get around. Enter the riderless bike. A small Vancouver, B.C. startup, RDRLESS, is banking on the idea that people will want bicycles that ride themselves in the future.
The transportation of the future doesn’t have four wheels, it’s got two. Vancouver startup RDRLESS shows what its new cycle can do in this latest video from This Is That. 3:17

The driverless car is widely heralded as the transportation method of the future but many critics say there are more efficient and greener ways to navigate through our world.

Enter the riderless bike. The small Vancouver, B.C., startup RDRLESS, is banking on the idea that people will want bicycles that ride themselves in the near future. 
Shelia McKenzie uses the RDRLESS app to send her bike off to work. (Joseph Schweers/Derek Pante)

"Although Google is also working on an autonomous bike, ours is more disruptive because it doesn't require a rider at all," claims CEO Bill Lindsay. "This also makes ours safer because it completely eliminates human error."

Shelia McKenzie, is a beta-user of RDRLESS and she loves using her bike on weekends: "Friends will often call me up to go on a bike ride but I'd rather stay inside and watch Scandal. Now I just send my bike while I curl up with Kerry Washington."

RDRLESS is still in the prototyping phase but will be launching in August and rolling out a tandem bike next spring.


This is That is an award-winning satirical current affairs show that doesn't just talk about the issues, it fabricates them.

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