This is That

Alberta oil planes, storm spotter, CSIS rebrand, no swearing challenge

This week on This Is That: An Alberta energy company believes they've come up with the perfect alternative to the pipeline: Oil planes. We give you a sneak peek at CBC Television's new talent search show, 5 Seconds to Become a Star....

Season 3 Episode 14

Listen to the full episode26:30
This week on This Is That: An Alberta energy company believes they've come up with the perfect alternative to the pipeline: Oil planes.

We give you a sneak peek at CBC Television's new talent search show, 5 Seconds to Become a Star.

After 75 years, Canada's oldest and best known "storm spotter" is calling it quits and Pat Kelly talks to him about a life of watching weather.
 
Canada's federal intelligence agency, CSIS, is under-fire this week for reckless spending. The Head of Personnel for CSIS, Ken Danhurst, is on the show to explain what they spent so much on.

We profile the Northern Alberta town that is currently in the middle of a challenge that is asking citizens to not use any foul language for 30 days. 

Plus, we play your calls in reaction to the student that is in a legal battle with the University of Nanaimo for their failure to accommodate her "visual allergies."

This is the last day to vote in our Listener Headline Challenge, the polls close to today at 12pm PT.

This week we also broke the news that Canada is "literally dripping with maple syrup" and we reminded you of our seasonal holiday song, "Holiday Everything."


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Related:

Alberta energy company to use airplanes instead of pipeline to transport oil

Listener Headline Challenge: Top 5 Poll

University of Nanaimo sued after refusing to accommodate student with 'visual allergies'

Iowa marriage town, Windsor public gathering, Nova Scotia Shakespeare, visual allergies, guitar duo

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