Poetry in Voice

Tens of thousands of high-school students from across Canada took part in this year's competition, by memorizing and reciting a poem in their classrooms. We have three prize-winning performances.
(David Waldman)
Listen7:28

Learning to recite poetry is about more than memorizing the lines. It's about rhythm, intonation and pacing. And it's about appreciating - even dancing - with the words, in front of an audience. 

This week, students competed in the national finals of the 6th annual "Poetry in Voice" contest, which is sponsored by The Griffin Trust for Excellence in Poetry. 

It began in the classroom, in French and English and sometimes both. Finalists were selected from thousands of high school participants. 

On Thursday, in Toronto, before a live audience, finalists took to the stage and tried to wow the judges.  Here are the top prize-winning performers in English:

Nebou N'Diaye, from Ecole Secondaire St-Joseph in St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, the runner-up for the English Prize. She recited "i am graffiti", by Leanne Simpson. (David Waldman)
Marie Foolchand of Ecole Secondaire Étienne-Brûlé in Toronto. Her poem was "I Am the People, the Mob" by Carl Sandburg. (David Waldman)
Enzo Campa of Assumption College, Windsor, Ontario. Enzo was the winner in the English Prize stream. He recited "Echolalia", by Ian Williams. (David Waldman)

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