The Sunday Edition

The Sisters of St. Ann confront the end with dignity and grace

Back in the 1960s, the Sisters of St. Ann were a fiercely self-reliant Roman Catholic order of nuns numbering 300. Today, only two dozen remain. Listen to Jennifer Chrumka’s documentary “In Our End Is Our Beginning.”
On the left: the current Sisters of Ann congregation. On the right: Blessed Marie-Anne Blondin, the foundress of the Sisters of St. Ann. (Submitted by the Sisters of St. Ann)
Listen23:50

The Sisters of St. Ann face the end - of their order and their own lives.  Once a large and influential community of BC nuns, they are now just a handful. As they mark their 160th anniversary, justice, legacy and mission are on their minds.

And they are determined to live fully to the last second. Jennifer Chrumka's documentary is called "In Our End Is Our Beginning."

Click 'listen' above to hear Jennifer Chrumka's full documentary "In Our End Is Our Beginning."

The Sisters of St. Ann established schools in Victoria. (Royal BC Museum)
The Sisters of St. Ann established hospitals and healthcare facilities in British Columbia. (Royal BC Museum )
The Sisters of St. Ann archives are located within the Royal BC Museum. (Submitted by the Sisters of St. Ann)
From L to R: ​Sister Marina Smith, Sister Marie Zarowny, Sister Judy Moren, Sister Assunta Campese and Sister Joyce Harris. (Submitted by the Sisters of St. Ann)