The Sunday Edition

The angry populism of '68; Sadik-Khan on Urban Revolution; Margot Bentley; Justice Abella goes to Yale

Donald Trump is not the first demagogue to terrify US political elites in a presidential election - Michael's essay: In 1968, George Wallace, the segregationist governor of Alabama ran as a third party candidate. Not unlike now, Americans were frightened, angry and utterly cynical about national politics. As Washington correspondent for The Globe and Mail, Michael had a front-row seat to another time of angry populism and anti-government rhetoric. Janette Sadik-Khan's vision for making a modern city great: When she was transportation commissioner for New York City, Ms. Sadik-Khan banned cars from Times Square and installed 400 miles of separated bicycle lanes. Some call her courageous and visionary; others find her brusque and unwilling to compromise. Her new book is called Street Fight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution. Margot Bentley made it clear that she wanted to die, but the courts say no: Margot Bentley is a former nurse who put her end-of-life wishes in writing. Now, 17 years into dementia, and many court cases later, she is being kept alive, all because she opens her mouth in the presence of a spoon. Karin Wells's documentary is called "In the Presence of a Spoon." How Supreme Court Justice Rosalie Abella made Yale law grads cry on the happiest day of their lives: As she accepted an honorary degree from Yale Law School, Justice Abella told the story of her own life, to illustrate the purpose of the law as she sees it. Extra helpings of great music this week by: The Turtle Island Quartet, guitarist Don Alder, Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys, Andrea Superstein, Marjan Mozetich, Mario Bernardi and the CBC Vancouver Orchestra, Georges Bizet, Sir Andrew Davis and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Chaim Tannenbaum, Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, Suzy LeBlanc and Montreal-based viol consort Les Voix Humaines, and Scott Poll and the Pollcats.
Listen to the full episode1:42:28

Donald Trump is not the first demagogue to terrify US political elites in a presidential election - Michael's essay: In 1968, George Wallace, the segregationist governor of Alabama ran as a third party candidate. Not unlike now, Americans were frightened, angry and utterly cynical about national politics. As Washington correspondent for The Globe and Mail, Michael had a front-row seat to another time of angry populism and anti-government rhetoric.

Janette Sadik-Khan's vision for making a modern city great: When she was transportation commissioner for New York City, Ms. Sadik-Khan banned cars from Times Square and installed 400 miles of separated bicycle lanes. Some call her courageous and visionary; others find her brusque and unwilling to compromise.  Her new book is called Street Fight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution.

Margot Bentley made it clear that she wanted to die, but the courts say no:  Margot Bentley is a former nurse who put her end-of-life wishes in writing. Now, 17 years into dementia, and many court cases later, she is being kept alive, all because she opens her mouth in the presence of a spoon. Karin Wells's documentary is called "In the Presence of a Spoon."

How Supreme Court Justice Rosalie Abella made Yale law grads cry on the happiest day of their lives: As she accepted an honorary degree from Yale Law School, Justice Abella told the story of her own life, to illustrate the purpose of the law as she sees it.

Extra helpings of great music this week by: The Turtle Island Quartet, guitarist Don Alder, Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys, Andrea Superstein, Marjan Mozetich, Mario Bernardi and the CBC Vancouver Orchestra, Georges Bizet, Sir Andrew Davis and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Chaim Tannenbaum, Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, Suzy LeBlanc and Montreal-based viol consort Les Voix Humaines, and Scott Poll and the Pollcats.