The Sunday Edition

President-elect Trump - The truth; Class; Letters; Media and Foreign Policy

The transformation of American political culture - Michael's essay: Here's an excerpt: "Emotion has replaced truth. How you feel is now more important that what you know to be true." Dear President-Elect Trump: We invited five people to write open letters to the incoming president. Cherríe Moraga is a Chicana feminist activist, poet and playwright at Stanford University. Katharine Hayhoe is director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. Claire Messud is an American writer and teacher, best known as the author of the novel The Emperor's Children. Clifford Orwin is a Canadian political science professor and commentator. Yolanda Wisher is Philadelphia's poet-laureate, who focuses on the experience of being African-American. Why Hillary lost and Donald won: Thomas Frank, the fair but fierce critic of the Washington political establishment, says this was an election about class. Trump is a "blue-collar billionaire" who can speak to working people; Hillary Clinton is a technocrat who cannot. The role of television in the creation of Donald Trump: The seminal argument about celebrity's corrosive effect on society was developed by the late media theorist and cultural critic Neil Postman, in his 1985 book, "Amusing Ourselves To Death". His son Andrew Postman says his famous father's ideas have never been more relevant. Is the world less safe following the election of Donald Trump? The president-elect has no experience in foreign policy, so it's hard to know whether his campaign promises to "bomb the s--t out of ISIS", start a trade war with China, or get Mexico to pay for a wall, will become reality. Michael talks to Paul Rogers, professor of Peace Studies at Bradford University.
Protesters take to the streets following an anti-Trump demonstration in front of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York on Nov. 12, 2016. (Kevin Hagen/EPA)
Listen to the full episode1:42:28

How could we — I — get so much so wrong? - Michael's essay: Here's an excerpt: "There are three things to think about right away: One, it's not our country; Two, he's not our leader and Three, Armageddon is not about to break out."

Dear President-Elect Trump: We invited five people to write open letters to the incoming president. Cherríe Moraga is a Chicana feminist activist, poet and playwright at Stanford University. Katharine Hayhoe is director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. Claire Messud is an American writer and teacher, best known as the author of the novel The Emperor's ChildrenClifford Orwin is a Canadian political science professor and commentator. Yolanda Wisher is Philadelphia's poet-laureate, who focuses on the experience of being African-American.

Why Hillary lost and Donald won: Thomas Frank, the fair but fierce critic of the Washington political establishment, says this was an election about class. Trump is a "blue-collar billionaire" who can speak to working people; Hillary Clinton is a technocrat who cannot. Frank's most recent book is Listen, Liberal: Or, Whatever Happened to the Party of the People?

The role of television in the creation of Donald Trump: The seminal argument about celebrity's corrosive effect on society was developed by the late media theorist and cultural critic Neil Postman, in his 1985 book, Amusing Ourselves To Death. His son Andrew Postman says his famous father's ideas -- now magnified by social media -- explain Donald Trump's meteoric metamorphosis from reality TV star to the world's most powerful man.

What will Donald Trump's foreign policy be like? The president-elect has no experience in foreign policy, so it's hard to know whether his campaign promises to "bomb the s--t out of ISIS", start a trade war with China, or get Mexico to pay for a wall, will become reality. Michael talks to Paul Rogers, professor of Peace Studies at Bradford University.

Music this week by: Leonard Cohen, Leonard Cohen, and Leonard Cohen -- performed by Leonard Cohen, Yaron Herman, Anjani Thomas, Francis Covan and Francis Tetu.

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