The Sunday Edition

Myth of an independent FBI; Campaign fever; Chrystia Freeland on CETA; Sir Simon Rattle

The appealing myth that the FBI is independent - Michael's essay: Director James Comey's decision to reopen the investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails follows a long tradition of FBI interference in party politics. Campaign Fever: Michael and his guests review the issues swirling around the U.S. presidential race. Panellists are: Patricia Williams, Professor of law at Columbia University and author of "The Alchemy of Race and Rights"; prominent conservative and former George W. Bush speechwriter David Frum and Moustafa Bayoumi, author of "This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror". Signing CETA: A feature interview with Chrystia Freeland, Canada's Minister of International Trade, who successfully negotiated a free trade agreement between Canada and Europe. Sir Simon Rattle, one of the world's top conductors, is currently Artistic Director of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. He talks to Michael about what it was like to hear Mahler's 2nd Symphony at the age of 11, why it's essential to introduce audiences to contemporary music, and why politicians should show up at concerts.
Listen to the full episode1:42:28

The appealing myth that the FBI is independent - Michael's essay: Director James Comey's decision to reopen the investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails follows a long tradition of FBI interference in party politics.

The horror! The horror! Campaigning into the Heart of Darkness:  Michael and his guests review the issues swirling around the U.S. presidential race. Panellists are: Patricia Williams, professor of law at Columbia University and author of The Alchemy of Race and Rights; prominent conservative and former George W. Bush speechwriter David Frum and Moustafa Bayoumi, author of This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror.

Signing CETA: A feature interview with Chrystia Freeland, Canada's Minister of International Trade, who negotiated the free trade agreement between Canada and Europe. The deal comes as protectionism grows around the globe, fed by concerns about job loss and income inequality.

Sir Simon Rattle on the future of live classical music: Rattle, one of the world's top conductors, is currently Artistic Director of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. He talks to Michael about what it was like to hear Mahler's 2nd Symphony at the age of 11, why it's essential to introduce audiences to contemporary music, and why politicians should show up at concerts. Sir Simon Rattle and the Berlin Philharmonic perform at Toronto's Roy Thomson Hall, on November 15 and 16th.