The Sunday Edition

Media clichés; Populism in Canada; Chekhov for the 21st century

Let's step up, reach out and throw clichés under the bus - Michael's essay: The media are bringing out their new spring line of clichés. We ignore anti-elitist sentiment in Canada at our peril - Preston Manning: Mr. Manning says economic uncertainty and concerns over immigration are feeding populist sentiment which, unless acknowledged, could lead to a Trump-like revolt here in Canada. The Music That Changed My World: Listeners respond to Robert Harris's appearance on the program last week, with stories about how they first came to classical music. We Must Go On Living: Anton Chekhov for the 21st Century: It has been more than a century since the great Russian writer Anton Chekhov died, but his stories and plays read as if they had been written last week. Our special one-hour broadcast is produced by Pauline Holdsworth. Music this week by: Ben Heppner, W.A. Mozart, Giacomo Puccini, and a sprinkling of romantic Russians -- Sergei Rachmaninoff, Vladimir Ashkenazy and Pyotr Tchaikovsky.
Listen to the full episode1:42:28

Let's step up, reach out and throw clichés under the bus - Michael's essay: ​The media are bringing out their new spring line of clichés.

We ignore anti-elitist sentiment in Canada at our peril: Preston Manning says economic uncertainty and concerns over immigration are feeding populist sentiment which, unless acknowledged, could lead to a Trump-like revolt here in Canada.

The Music That Changed My World: Listeners respond to Robert Harris's appearance on the program last week, with stories about how they first came to classical music. 

We Must Go On Living: Anton Chekhov for the 21st Century: It has been more than a century since the great Russian writer Anton Chekhov died, but his stories and plays read as if they had been written last week. Our special one-hour broadcast is produced by Pauline Holdsworth..

Music this week by: Ben Heppner, W.A. Mozart, Giacomo Puccini, and a sprinkling of romantic Russians -- Sergei Rachmaninoff, Vladimir Ashkenazy and Pyotr Tchaikovsky.