The Sunday Edition

Digital detox; Gravitas; Plastic-free aisle; Feminist bookstore; The bestseller-ometer; Mouldy head

A day without screens - Michael's essay: It's tough to fight an addiction. Perhaps a Digital Detox is the solution. The Death of Gravitas: There are signs we are no longer taking serious things seriously. The opinions of movie stars carry more weight than the expertise of scientists. Mail - The high price of glasses: Listeners react to David Gutnick's documentary about Montreal optician Philippe Rochette -- aka "le bonhomme à lunettes" Banning plastic from one supermarket aisle: British businesswoman Sian Sutherland's new environmental campaign is called, "A Plastic Planet". Our Bodies, Our Shelves: David Gutnick attends the grand opening of Montreal's new feminist bookstore, L'Euguélionne. How a computer might pick out the next Harry Potter or Danielle Steele: A computer algorithm called the "bestseller-ometer" attempts to predict whether a novel will hit it big. Evolution of a Mouldy Head: An old book infects Thelma Fayle with more than a new idea.
Listen to the full episode1:42:27

A day without screens - Michael's essay: It's tough to fight an addiction. Perhaps a Digital Detox is the solution.

The Death of Gravitas: There are signs we are no longer taking serious things seriously. The opinions of movie stars carry more weight than the expertise of scientists. Reality TV stars run for public office. Michael's guests are philosopher Joe Heath; political scientist Susan McWilliams, and a man who we believe had gravitas in the cradle, long-time activist for social justice, Stephen Lewis.

Mail - The high price of glasses: Listeners react to David Gutnick's documentary about Montreal optician Philippe Rochette -- aka "le bonhomme à lunettes" -- who sells glasses for a fraction of what they cost at most opticians' stores.

Banning plastic from one supermarket aisle: British businesswoman Sian Sutherland wants to make a dent in the volume of plastic waste polluting the world's oceans. Her new environmental campaign is called, "A Plastic Planet".

Our Bodies, Our Shelves: Once upon a time, there were dozens of feminist bookstores across Canada. And then there were none. Some brave young Montrealers decided to do something about that. David Gutnickattends the grand opening of  L'Euguélionne.

How a computer might pick out the next Harry Potter or Danielle Steele:  A computer algorithm called the "bestseller-ometer" has found 2,800 elements that can predict whether a novel will hit it big -- and publishers are using it. Michael talks to Susanne Althoff, who teaches writing, literature and publishing at Emerson College in Boston, 

Evolution of a Moldy Head - Essay: An old book infects Thelma Fayle with more than a new idea.