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The Sunday Edition for August 25, 2019

Listen to this week's episode with guest host Connie Walker.

'We worked until our breath gave out': The political and environmental roots of India's deadly heat wave

Delhi-based journalist and author Nilanjana Roy talks about what life is like at 48 degrees Celsius and how difficult it is to get climate change on the national agenda.

How desegregation led this TSO trumpeter to the teacher who changed his life

In 1981, Andrew McCandless, 10, was bused from his white working-class community to an overwhelmingly black middle school, where he met Robert Jarrett. More than 30 years later, he honoured his mentor.

"An enormous change in the news agenda": How trauma-informed reporting is transforming journalism

It's a journalist's job to find the human stories behind disasters, violence, tragedy and hardship. But the telling of these stories can sometimes have devastating impacts for the subject and sometimes the journalist.

Sixth-graders in a nursing home — an unlikely but 'life-changing' school year

For 25 Grade 6 students in Saskatoon, school happens in a nursing home — all year long. Talk about a different kind of education. David Gutnick's documentary is called "The School of Real Life."

Too long, didn't read — how reading online is hurting our brains

Research shows the internet is shortening our attention span and harming memory, creativity, wisdom and the capacity for empathy and critical thinking. Michael Enright talks to Maryanne Wolf, the author of Come Home: The Reading Brain in the Digital World.

How a sexual assault victim's lawsuit set a precedent that alarmed the Catholic Church

As a boy, Rod MacLeod was sexually assaulted by a Basilian priest over a period of four years. He refused all offers to settle his case out of court; instead, he went to lawyer Rob Talach, known as "the priest hunter."

The Sunday Edition for August 18, 2019

Listen to this week's episode with guest host David Gray.

Three Canadian climbers discuss the risks and rewards of extreme adventure

Sharon Wood, Laval St. Germain and Will Gadd are three Canadian adventurers who test human limits on extreme landscapes. They speak about about the risks and rewards of their incredible feats — and some of the world's most forbidding, yet vulnerable places.

Early risers are not necessarily healthier, wealthier or wiser

Early risers are seen as more dependable, more productive, even as holding the high moral ground. But maybe it’s time to think again. Camilla Kring, says we must abandon our nine-to-five mentality. She consults with organizations around the world about how to accommodate the internal sleep clocks of employees, and why that will improve life for everyone.

Newfoundland novelist Michael Crummey on the "appalling confusion" of childhood

Michael Crummey's latest book, The Innocents, is the story of an orphaned brother and sister struggling to survive, utterly alone, on a remote cove in 18th Century Newfoundland.

The Mamas and the Papas: How two Ottawa couples became co-parents

Ontario law passed in 2016 gave equal rights to same-sex parents and multi-parent families.

'An accident and a miracle': Remembering Woodstock, 50 years later

Woodstock was more than a music festival; it was a massive celebration of counterculture, free love, and peace. York University's rock 'n' roll professor, Rob Bowman, takes us back to those heady days of the 1960s with some of the tunes that installed the event on the musical map.
PERSONAL ESSAY

A pilgrim's journey: This woman hiked hundreds of kilometres to find peace

Like the hundreds of thousands of others who have walked the Camino de Santiago in Spain, Margaret Lynch saw herself in a new light. She tells the story of this personal journey of discovery in her essay.

The Sunday Edition for August 11, 2019

Listen to this week's episode with guest host David Gray.

What the explosion of immunotherapy research means for Canadian cancer patients

For decades, doctors have depended on surgery, radiation and chemotherapy to treat cancer patients. The new hope for many cancer scientists and patients is the emergence of immunotherapy — using the body's own immune system to fight cancer.

From the archives: Toni Morrison in conversation with Michael Enright

Toni Morrison, a giant of American literature and culture, died last Monday. In 1989, she spoke with Michael Enright on As It Happens, and they discussed what was then a growing movement among black Americans to refer to themselves as African-American.

Gun control in America: Re-examining the Second Amendment

Calls for tougher restrictions on guns in America are routinely batted away by gun advocates who invoke the Second Amendment. In this 2013 interview, we speak with Saul Cornell, a professor of history at Fordham University and the former Director of the Second Amendment Research Center about what the Second Amendment actually says and means.

Alexandra Oliver finds poetry in old films, the loneliness of parenthood and the aftermath of disaster

Canadian poet Alexandra Oliver uses old forms to explore contemporary concerns like the consequences of technology, living in the suburbs, and leaving places behind. Her recent books include Meeting the Tormentors in Safeway, Let the Empire Down and On the Oven Sits a Maiden.

We should hold identity with 'a lighter touch,' says philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah

Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah speaks with Michael Enright about the falsehoods and contradictions that prevent us from understanding who we really are, and how we can best live together. His book is called The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity.

A great honking joy! How the majestic trumpeter swan was rescued from extinction

When swan lover Beverly Kingdon and biologist Harry Lumsden joined forces, good things happened. The woman who loved swans and the Ontario wildlife scientist with a cause have worked tirelessly to bring the largest swans in the world back from the brink. Theirs is an environmental success story. Alisa Siegel’s documentary is called “A Village of Swans, A Village of People.”

The Sunday Edition for August 4, 2019

Listen to this week's episode with guest host Kevin Sylvester.

A gay Canadian referee on why homophobia almost drove him out of professional hockey

Andrea "Dre" Barone has loved playing hockey since he was a little kid. But the sport has not always loved him back. He has been subjected to abusive homophobic comments, which first left him feeling bruised but then inspired him to fight homophobia in the locker room and on the ice.

For nervous patients, a friendly dachshund takes the stress out of dentistry

A Toronto dentist has a secret weapon in her quest to soothe her patients: a friendly dog named Moishie who will happily snuggle for the duration of a procedure.

Daring, delight and a little darkness: A conversation with some of Canada's top children's book illustrators

Canada has always punched above its weight in the world of children's books, but we seem to be in a golden age right now, with Canadian illustrators winning international awards, hitting bestseller lists and changing tastes.

'An accident and a miracle': Remembering Woodstock, 50 years later

Woodstock was more than a music festival; it was a massive celebration of counterculture, free love, and peace. York University's rock 'n' roll professor, Rob Bowman, takes us back to those heady days of the 1960s with some of the tunes that installed the event on the musical map.