The Next Chapter·Like This? Love That

If you liked Young Skins by Colin Barrett, you'll love Megan Gail Coles's 2014 short fiction debut

The Next Chapter listener Terry Doyle compares Newfoundland's Megan Gail Coles's Eating Habits of the Chronically Lonesome and Young Skins by Irish writer Colin Barrett.
The Next Chapter listener Terry Doyle compares Newfoundland's Megan Gail Coles' Eating Habits of the Chronically Lonesome and Young Skins by Irish writer Colin Barrett. (Grove Atlantic, Breakwater Books)

This interview originally aired on Nov. 23, 2019.

Young Skins by Irish writer Colin Barrett is a 2013 debut collection of short stories that are equal parts irreverent, gritty and psychologically complex.

The Next Chapter listener Terry Doyle says that 2019 Scotiabank Giller Prize-shortlisted author Megan Gail Coles's 2014 short story collection Eating Habits of the Chronically Lonesome is the perfect Canadian companion to that book. 

Young Skins by Colin Barrett

Colin Barrett is an Irish-born author. Young Skins is his 2013 short fiction debut about the complex lives of characters living in Ireland. (Grove Atlantic)

"Both books are full of longing and longing to escape. Both are also about accepting fate and they're both deeply rooted in place in dealing with Ireland and Newfoundland's history of diaspora. They examine this feeling of connection or disconnection from a place —  or the push and pull back to that place." 

Eating Habits of the Chronically Lonesome by Megan Gail Coles

Megan Gail Coles's 2014 short fiction debut Eating Habits of the Chronically Lonesome explored complex characters living in Newfoundland. (Courtesy of Playwrights Canada Press/Breakwater Books)

"I think both books are authentic and timeless. The characters crackle with desire. They both have black humour but with substance. I think the prose styles are a little different but the content of these stories feel similar to me. Both authors are the same age and I think both of these books give a great view of contemporary life both in Ireland and in Canada."

Terry Doyle's comments have been edited for length and clarity.

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