The Next Chapter

How Yannick Bisson gets inspiration from the history of cars

The Murdoch Mysteries star shares why he liked reading Porsche 911: Fifty Years by Randy Leffingwell.
Murdoch Mysteries star Yannick Bisson recommends Porsche 911: Fifty Years by Randy Leffingwell. (CBC/Sinisa Jolic)

Yannick Bisson is the star of the CBC's Murdoch Mysteries and is a keen motorist. He recommends that fans of cars check out Porsche 911: Fifty Years by Randy Leffingwell. 

"Leffingwell is a very highly regarded Porsche and motorsport in general historian. He's also a photographer. Some people might not think it's a very serious book because it's a coffee table book. But it's stunning and very detailed. One of the things that I like in life is motor sports and specifically, the motor sports history that Porsche created. That's the car that spoke to me when I was a kid and that's the thing that I'm very enthusiastic about. In fact, I'm building a Porsche right now. 

I think a lot of us are looking for touchstones — things that are real things, that are handmade, that have history, things that are not disposable.- Yannick Bisson

"I think a lot of us are looking for touchstones — things that are real things, that are handmade, that have history, things that are not disposable. That's what these cars have always been to me. They're not disposable. Especially up until 1998, they weren't machine made. They were still handmade and I always found it fascinating that they could achieve such a high standard of workmanship."

Yannick Bisson on being a teenager

Murdoch Mysteries

1 year ago
3:12
The Murdoch Mysteries star talks about growing up and lessons he's learned along the way. 3:12

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