The House

The House: New Zealand attack and Tuesday's big budget

This week on The House, guest host Vassy Kapelos explores the power of political reaction to atrocities like the Christchurch mosque shootings with Ihsaan Gardee of the National Council of Canadian Muslims. Then, Labour Minister Patty Hajdu and our panel of journalists look ahead to Tuesday's federal budget.
A man reacts as he speaks on a mobile phone outside the scene of a gun massacre at a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019. (Mark Baker/Associated Press)
Listen to the full episode49:59

This week on The House, guest host Vassy Kapelos explores the power of political reaction to atrocities like the Christchurch mosque shootings, with Ihsaan Gardee of the National Council of Canadian Muslims. Then, Labour Minister Patty Hajdu and journalists Josh Wingrove and Tom Clark look ahead to Tuesday's federal budget.

Here's a look at what's on the show:

'Ideologies get normalized, then popularized, then actualized'

Police attempt to clear people from outside the scene of a deadly shooting at a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019. (Mark Baker/Associated Press)

On Friday, at least 50 people died in two mosque shootings in Christchurch, New Zealand. The attacks prompted immediate reaction on social media and through statements by politicians around the world, including elected officials in Canada.

The National Council of Canadian Muslims' executive director, Ihsaan Gardee, spoke to guest host Vassy Kapelos in an interview airing Saturday about the importance of the words politicians use when referring to anti-Muslim attacks. 

"Let's be clear. Even the perpetrator of this horrific act has come out in his manifesto and stated this is terrorism," Gardee said, adding he wants politicians to be "even stronger in the language they use to speak out against these ideologies."

"Otherwise, they get normalized, then they get popularized and then eventually they get actualized."

Listen to the full interview with Gardee below. 

The National Council of Canadian Muslims' executive director, Ihsaan Gardee, spoke to guest host Vassy Kapelos in an interview airing Saturday about the importance of the words politicians use when referring to anti-Muslim attacks. 9:34

Looking ahead to the federal budget

Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau takes questions from children from the Toronto and Kiwanis Boys and Girls Club after putting on his new budget shoes for a pre-budget photo opportunity in Toronto on Thursday, March 14, 2019. (Chris Young/Canadian Press)

On Tuesday, federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau will unveil his last budget before the fall election. It comes after more than a month of the SNC-Lavalin controversy dominating headlines. Will the budget change the channel for the Liberals?

"What people are talking to me the most about is not a balanced budget but what are we going to do about the labour shortage," Labour Minister Patty Hajdu told Vassy in an interview airing Saturday on The House.

"We're going to continue to make sure education is affordable, that skills training can be accessed at any time during your life and career, and we're focusing on skilled trades and apprenticeships."

Listen to the full interview with Hajdu in the player below.

In the wake of SNC-Lavalin and with a federal budget around the corner, labour minister Patty Hajdu talks about both events with guest host Vassy Kapelos. 10:33

With money for skills training likely to be included in this year's budget, the Business Council of Canada's Valerie Walker joined Vassy to discuss what can be expected. 

"To stay competitive, Canada needs to make sure our people, our workforce, have the skills to be able to continue thriving in their jobs," she said in a separate interview, also airing Saturday.

With money for skills training likely to be included in this year's budget, the Business Council of Canada's Valerie Walker joined Vassy Kapelos to discuss what can be expected. 6:44

"Specifically we're hearing [two] things from our CEOs," she said. "They don't always see new graduates show up at their first job out of school being able to properly leverage that strong educational background. Maybe they didn't have a work experience when they were in school, so they aren't able to hit the ground running.

"The second thing they tell us is that their mid-career workers need to change some of the skills and adapt as the type of work they do changes."

Walker said she's hoping to see measures in the budget to address those issues.

Vassy also talked to a panel of current and former journalists about the political messaging that goes on in a pre-election budget. Tom Clark, former host of Global's The West Block, and Bloomberg's Josh Wingrove dig into budget talk and the SNC-Lavalin controversy, and also weigh in on politicians' rhetoric following terror attacks.

Panelists Josh Wingrove and Tom Clark look ahead to Tuesday's federal budget, talk about the attack in New Zealand that killed dozens, and look back on the SNC-Lavalin affair so far. 12:08

Tina Fontaine's legacy and Indigenous child welfare

The late Tina Fontaine (CBC News)

The details of Tina Fontaine's short life prior to her death at age 14 in 2014 were tragic enough for her great-aunt to suggest that her family was "doomed from the beginning" — but it was the child welfare system that failed her, not fate.

A report out this week is making recommendations to four provincial departments in Manitoba in an attempt to close the gaps found in the child welfare system. The federal government also is trying to address those issues through the introduction of its Indigenous child welfare bill last month.

Tina Fontaine spent much of her life in and out of government care. Her body, wrapped in a duvet weighted down by rocks, was pulled from Winnipeg's Red River on Aug. 17, 2014. Police arrested Raymond Cormier, a drifter and drug user, and charged him with murdering Tina, but a jury acquitted him. No one has ever been convicted in her death.

Ottawa's legislation is meant to reverse the over-representation of Indigenous kids in foster care and give Indigenous peoples jurisdiction over child welfare in their communities.

Will the bill be enough to prevent the deaths of more kids like Tina? 

Listen to a special report by CBC's Cameron MacIntosh for The House from Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba.

The details of Tina Fontaine's short life prior to her death at age 14 in 2014 were tragic enough for her great-aunt to suggest that her family was "doomed from the beginning" - but it was the child welfare system that failed her, not fate. Listen to a special report by CBC's Cameron MacIntosh for The House from Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba. 3:49

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