Stephen Harper won't change course

This week on The House, Conservative leader Stephen Harper sits down with Chris Hall to discuss his plan for the economy and why, despite acknowledging that Canadians feel vulnerable about the state of the economy under his leadership, his approach will not change.
Conservative leader Stephen Harper takes part in the Globe and Mail leaders' debate Thursday, September 17, 2015 in Calgary.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)
Listen to the full episode49:59

He's stuck in a three-way race with the NDP and the Liberals.

While both parties are arguing for change, Stephen Harper says Canadians should trust that his plan is the safest one. What would the Conservative leader do with another mandate?

Stephen Harper sits down with Chris Hall to discuss his plan for the economy and why, despite acknowledging that Canadians feel vulnerable about the state of the economy under his leadership, his plan will not change.

After weeks of questions, the NDP has finally put out its fiscal plan. But will the gamble to promise a balanced budget pay off? NDP candidate Andrew Thomson joins us to discuss.

Then, Naomi Klein felt some key issues were not getting discussed during the campaign, and with the possibility of a coalition government at the end of all this, the author and activist spearheaded the Leap Manifesto. She joins us to explain what she hopes to accomplish.

Our debate reviewers, David McLaughlin, former chief of staff to Brian Mulroney, Scott Reid, communications lead for the 2006 Liberal campaign and Kathleen Monk, former director of strategic communications for Jack Layton, join us to go over Thursday night's economic debate.

Then our polls analyst Éric Grenier talks about how debates can move polls.

And finally, In House analysts Rosemary Barton and Andrew Coyne weigh in on what might create some separation between the various parties.