Ecofiscal Commission helps Canadian governments tackle climate change

Chris Ragan, an economics professor at McGill University and the chair of Canada's Ecofiscal Commission tells Chris Hall that both the Prime Minister and the premiers need to engage on the issue of climate change at an international level.
Listen11:25

Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau has been clear he thinks Canada needs "an ambitious plan" for tackling climate change

But with a majority mandate comes major expectations from Canadians and from abroad — and the world will be watching next month in Paris, at the United Nations conference on climate change. 

So what role should the federal government play in setting standards?

That's where Chris Ragan steps in. The economics professor at McGill University and the chair of Canada's Ecofiscal Commission tells Chris Hall that both the Prime Minister and the premiers need to engage on the issue at an international level.

"Canada needs to play, and not just the federal government but the provincial governments as well," he said. 

"They need to play a constructive role in, frankly, what will be a very difficult international negotiation. You've got [approximately] 195 countries at a table trying to solve a collective action problem. So Canada needs to play a constructive role and be fully engaged in that process."

Ragan said the Ecofiscal Commission — made up of a group of economists working to find economic solutions to environmental problems — is focused on helping Canadian governments at different levels think about how best to implement policies and strategies.

"Whatever takes place in Paris, ultimately the policies aren't going to change unless each country actually implements effective policies at home," he said.

Listen to the full interview on The House in the player above.

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