The House

CBC Radio's The House: Will Alberta's new premier cause constitutional chaos?

On this week’s show: Alberta has a new premier. Danielle Smith discusses her province’s relationship with Ottawa, and two strategists weigh in on what this leadership change means for the rest of Canada. Plus — we hear from women inside Iran who are protesting their government, and a foreign affairs analyst breaks down new measures from Canada. Plus, two energy experts talk about what this country needs to do to expand and secure its electrical grid.

Here is what's on this week's episode

Danielle Smith waves to the crowd.
Danielle Smith celebrates after being chosen as the new leader of the United Conservative Party and next Alberta premier in Calgary on Oct. 6, 2022. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)
Alberta has a new premier. Danielle Smith discusses her vision for the province’s future and two strategists weigh in on what this leadership change means for the rest of Canada. Plus — we hear from women inside Iran who are protesting their government and a foreign affairs analyst breaks down Canada's new sanctions. Plus, two energy experts talk about what this country needs to do to expand and secure its electrical grid.

A new future for Alberta

Candidate Danielle Smith ran for the leadership of the United Conservative Party on a message of securing autonomy for Alberta and standing up to Ottawa. Will premier-designate Danielle Smith follow through on her leadership race rhetoric? And what would that mean for the rest of Canada?

Smith joins host Catherine Cullen to discuss her approach to dealing with Ottawa. Then we hear from Zain Velji, a federal Liberal strategist and partner at Northweather, and Katy Merrifield, a former staffer for Premier Jason Kenney and vice-president of Wellington Advocacy.

Alberta’s premier-designate Danielle Smith talks about her agenda for Alberta, and strategists Zain Velji and Katy Merrifield discuss what Smith’s win could mean for the rest of Canada.

How should Canada respond to the Iranian protests?

Iranian women have been burning their hijabs, cutting their hair and taking to the streets to demand regime change in the weeks since the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini. CBC's Nahayat Tizhoosh spoke to some protesters about why they feel compelled to risk everything for a dream of a brighter future — and what they want Canada to do in response to the protests.

On Friday, the federal government announced it would bar thousands of members of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) from entering Canada. Former Department of National Defence analyst and University of Ottawa Iran expert Thomas Juneau lays out the options that are open to the government.

Iranian women share their stories of protesting against the government and why they want change. And University of Ottawa Iran expert Thomas Juneau discusses new sanctions announced by Ottawa Friday.

How stable is Canada's electricity grid?

Thousands of Canadians were left without power in Atlantic Canada for more than a week after Fiona hit — and many still don't have it. It's not a rare experience in this age of severe storms and other extreme weather events. How reliable are Canada's electrical grids in the face of climate change?

Kristen van de Beizenbos, an associate professor of law at the University of Calgary, and Bruce Lourie, president of the environmental organization Ivey Foundation, tell host Catherine Cullen that Canada needs to invest massively in its electricity infrastructure and regions must start co-operating to ensure the lights stay on for all.

Canada’s electrical grids are facing more extreme weather events and a massive expansion of demand in the coming decades. Energy experts Kristen van de Biezenbos and Bruce Lourie discuss how to make the system both bigger and more resilient.

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