The House

CBC Radio's The House — Battle for influence: Canada's foreign minister on dealing with a dangerous world

On this week’s show: The House digs into Canada’s changing foreign policy, hearing from Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly, before former diplomat Michael Small and the Business Council of Canada’s Goldy Hyder discuss the concept of “friendshoring.” Then, the CBC’s Emma Godmere looks into the trend of federal and provincial politicians taking up municipal roles. Plus — two journalists break down this week at the Emergencies Act inquiry.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

Canada's Foreign Minister Melanie Joly speaks during a news conference with Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Sept. 30, 2022 at the State Department in Washington. (Jacquelyn Martin/The Associated Press)
The House digs into Canada’s changing foreign policy, hearing from Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly, before former diplomat Michael Small and the Business Council of Canada’s Goldy Hyder discuss the concept of “friendshoring.” Then, the CBC’s Emma Godmere looks into the trend of federal and provincial politicians taking up municipal roles. Plus — two journalists break down this week at the Emergencies Act inquiry.

Foreign Minister Mélanie Joly on Canada's shifting foreign policy

The threat of a dirty bomb attack is just the latest concern about Russia's war on Ukraine, a conflict that is fast reshaping global politics. Earlier this month, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland outlined how Canada will tackle this new geopolitical reality by focusing on trade with friendly nations.

Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly sits down with host Catherine Cullen to discuss this approach, while Conservative foreign affairs critic Michael Chong offers his party's take. Then, former diplomat Michael Small and the Business Council of Canada's Goldy Hyder discuss whether Canada is really ready to embrace "friendshoring."

Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly sits down with host Catherine Cullen to discuss Canada’s foreign policy approach, before former diplomat Michael Small and the Business Council of Canada’s Goldy Hyder discuss whether Canada is really ready to embrace “friendshoring.”

Why are so many federal and provincial politicians moving into the mayor's chair?

Ontario voters elected at least a dozen former MPs or MPPs to be their mayors this week. Are some attempting to resurrect their careers — or is city hall simply a better place to work? 

CBC's Emma Godmere speaks to newly elected Ontario mayors Andrea Horwath, Alex Nuttall and Ken Boshcoff about why they made the switch. Former Calgary mayor Naheed Nenshi, Winnipeg political analyst Shannon Sampert and Samara Centre for Democracy Executive Director Sabreena Delhon also weigh in on the lure of municipal politics.

CBC’s Emma Godmere speaks to newly elected mayors and experts about why so many provincial and federal politicians are making the leap to municipal politics.

Breaking down the third week of the Emergencies Act inquiry

The public inquiry looking into the federal government's use of the Emergencies Act earlier this year heard from a variety of police leaders this week about their efforts to bring to an end protests that became entrenched in downtown Ottawa for nearly a month. Next week, leaders of that convoy protest will get a chance to tell their side of the story.

CBC Ottawa reporter Shaamini Yogaretnam and Globe and Mail parliamentary reporter Marieke Walsh join the program to analyze what we've learned so far and preview next week's testimony.

CBC Ottawa reporter Shaamini Yogaretnam and Globe and Mail parliamentary reporter Marieke Walsh break down what we’ve learned from this week’s testimony at the Emergencies Act inquiry.

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