The House

CBC Radio's The House: Minister calls for culture shift on disabilities

On this week’s show: Two experts discuss the impact of calls for reform, public inquiries and high-profile crises affecting policing in Canada. The House hears from someone with a disability about her struggles to get by, and Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Minister Carla Qualtrough explains why a new benefit could be a “once in a generation” piece of legislation. Plus — 45 years after Commons proceedings were first broadcast and The House first went to air, two former MPs stroll down memory lane.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Carla Qualtrough is working on what she calls a "once-in-a-generation" change to Canada's social safety net. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)
Two experts discuss the impact of calls for reform, public inquiries and high-profile crises on policing in Canada. The House hears from someone with a disability about her struggles to get by, before Minister Carla Qualtrough explains why a new benefit could be a “once in a generation” piece of legislation. Plus — 45 years after Commons proceedings were first broadcast and The House went to air, two former MPs stroll down memory lane.

The perilous state of policing in Canada

Police leadership across Canada is facing significant criticism over a series of high-profile and contentious events: the convoy protests in Ottawa earlier this year, the RCMP's handling of the Nova Scotia murders in 2020 and the stabbing spree in James Smith Cree Nation last month. Among officers, morale is low, recruitment is difficult and fear for safety is high with four police officers having died on duty in recent weeks.

What is the state of policing in Canada right now, in the midst of controversy and calls for reform? Former police chief and B.C. solicitor general Kash Heed and University of Ottawa associate professor Michael Kempa join The House to discuss.

In the face of public inquiries, the recent deaths of four on duty officers and ongoing calls for reform, experts Kash Heed and Michael Kempa discuss the state of policing in Canada.

Canadians with disabilities waiting for Bill C-22

Roughly one million working-age Canadians with a disability live in poverty. The House hears from a single mother in B.C. about how she is cutting back on food while living on the province's monthly disability benefit.

Then, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Carla Qualtrough talks about Bill C-22, the legislation set to create a disability benefit for working-age Canadians. Qualtrough also responds to claims that some Canadians with disabilities are exploring medical assistance in dying because they can't get the support they need.

A single mom in B.C. describes living on provincial disability benefits and Minister Carla Qualtrough outlines her concerns with MAID and the disability community, as well as a bill to help lift people with disabilities out of poverty.

The House turns 45 and looks back at the dawn of parliamentary broadcasting

Before 1977, voters didn't really have a window into Parliament unless they travelled to Ottawa and watched from the galleries in person. The introduction of cameras heralded a new era of gavel-to-gavel coverage of the House of Commons — and led CBC to launch this very program on October 22, 1977.

In honour of The House's birthday, and to reflect on 45 years of parliamentary broadcasting from TV to TikTok, host Catherine Cullen sits down with two longtime former MPs who were present in the Commons when the cameras were first switched on: Perrin Beatty, former Progressive Conservative MP and minister, now president and CEO of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce; and Ralph Goodale, former Liberal MP and minister, now Canada's high commissioner to the U.K.

Former MPs Perrin Beatty and Ralph Goodale look back to when parliamentary proceedings were first broadcast on television and The House celebrated its inaugural year on the air.

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