The House

CBC Radio's The House: Bills, bills, bills

On this week’s show: Labour Minister Seamus O'Regan lays out new legislation aimed at protecting health care workers from harassment and lawyer Ian Runkle offers his take on existing measures in the Criminal Code. Plus — economists Armine Yalnizyan and Trevor Tombe discuss the latest concerns about inflation; Barbados bids adieu to the British monarchy; and a panel of journalists dissect Parliament's first week back.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole rises during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)
On this week’s show: Labour Minister Seamus O'Regan lays out new legislation aimed at protecting health care workers from harassment and lawyer Ian Runkle offers his take on existing measures in the Criminal Code. Plus — economists Armine Yalnizyan and Trevor Tombe discuss the latest concerns about inflation; Barbados bids adieu to the British monarchy; and a panel of journalists dissect Parliament's first week back.

Will new measures to protect health care workers do the job?

Labour Minister Seamus O'Regan joins host Chris Hall to discuss new legislation introduced during Parliament's first week back to provide paid sick leave to federally regulated workers and introduce changes to the Criminal Code to protect health care workers from harassment and intimidation.

Edmonton-based criminal defence lawyer Ian Runkle joins the program to offer his take. He argues that laws already exist to protect health care workers — and enforcement is the real issue.

Labour Minister Seamus O'Regan lays out new legislation aimed at protecting health-care workers from harassment and lawyer Ian Runkle offers his take on existing measures in the Criminal Code.

What's causing Canada's inflation woes?

Canada's inflation rate is at an 18-year high and people are starting to feel the pinch. The Conservatives argue that Liberal spending during the pandemic has flooded the economy with too much cash, resulting in inflationary pressures.

The House hears from consumers and business owners about how they're coping with rising costs, and host Chris Hall sits down with economists Armine Yalnizyan and Trevor Tombe to fact-check the Conservatives' claims and find out whether, and when, prices might stabilize.

Shoppers and business owners share their experiences with rising costs and prices, and a panel of economists offer their perspective on inflation in Canada.

Barbados is breaking up with the monarchy. Could we be next?

Next week, Barbados will officially bid adieu to the Queen, welcome a president and become a republic. And while it will remain a member of the Commonwealth, the fact that it's the first country to cut ties with the monarchy in nearly 30 years raises questions about whether more countries — such as Canada — could follow suit. 

CBC's Emma Godmere speaks with the University of the West Indies' Cynthia Barrow-Giles, Queen's University Dean of Law Mark Walters, Tom Freda of Citizens for a Canadian Republic and members of the Barbadian-Canadian organization Bridge T.O. to get a sense of this major political transition and whether it could ever happen here.

Next week, Barbados officially cuts ties with the Queen to become a republic. CBC’s Emma Godmere speaks with academic experts and Barbadian-Canadians to see whether a similar move could ever happen in Canada.

Parliament returns

It's Christmas come early for politics watchers — although with Christmas only a month away, it doesn't give the government much time to get things done. The House assembles political journalists Janyce McGregor of CBC News and Shannon Proudfoot of Maclean's magazine to pore over the week's parliamentary news. 

CBC’s Janyce McGregor and Shannon Proudfoot of Maclean’s break down a busy first week back in the House of Commons, which included debates over hybrid sittings and a new COVID variant.

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now