The House

CBC Radio's The House: Trouble in the fields

On this week’s show: As COP26 wraps up, Canadian farmers on the front lines of climate change pitch environmental solutions and a clean energy advocate dissects international competition in the electric vehicle industry. Three former MPs discuss the pressures facing parties on both sides of the aisle ahead of Parliament’s official return. Plus — a Remembrance Day conversation with an Afghan-Canadian who supported coalition forces in Afghanistan and a look at the politics of soccer in Canada.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

A wind farm generates electricity near bales of hay in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains near the town of Pincher Creek, Alberta. (Todd Korol/Reuters)
On this week’s show: As COP26 wraps up, Canadian farmers on the front lines of climate change pitch environmental solutions and a clean energy advocate dissects international competition in the electric vehicle industry. Three former MPs discuss the pressures facing parties on both sides of the aisle ahead of Parliament’s official return. Plus — a Remembrance Day conversation with an Afghan-Canadian who supported coalition forces in Afghanistan and a look at the politics of soccer in Canada.

Canadian farmers say they want to be part of climate change solutions

As the global COP26 meetings wrap up this week in Glasgow, some Canadian farmers are thinking about their role in addressing the climate crisis. Farms are on the front lines of climate change, often feeling the effects first. They can also be part of the solution by cutting emissions and sequestering carbon in the soil.

Chris Hall chats with three Canadian farmers — Mary Robinson, Cedric MacLeod and Brent Preston — about farming solutions for climate change and what kind of government support they need.

Three Canadian farmers from different regions of the country discuss their role in addressing the climate crisis and the support they need from the government in implementing solutions.

A complex Remembrance Day

Canadians observed Remembrance Day on Thursday — an occasion marked this year both by a return to more crowded ceremonies and by some very complex questions about national symbols and service. The House spoke with Ahmad Malgarai, who came to Canada from Afghanistan as a refugee in the 1990s but returned to his country of birth to help coalition forces after 2001.

The House hears from Ahmad Malgarai, who came to Canada from Afghanistan as a refugee in the 1990s but returned to his country of birth to support coalition forces after 2001.

Putting the green shift into high gear

The race is on for countries to carve out a slice of the growing low-carbon economy. But a proposed American tax credit could drain some of the energy out of Canada's efforts to become an electric vehicle manufacturing hub. 

Ottawa has threatened to dispute the measure, but what does the conflict say about the fight against climate change and the economic implications of a green transition? Joanna Kyriazis, a senior policy adviser at Clean Energy Canada, joins The House to discuss the green protectionism of the Biden administration.

Clean Energy Canada’s Joanna Kyriazis examines the United States’ proposed tax credit for electric vehicles and the potential impact of green protectionism on Canadian manufacturers.

The pre-sitting skirmishes of a minority Parliament

Ahead of Parliament's official return, the prospect of a Liberal-NDP deal and questions about unvaccinated Conservative MPs have taken over much of the political narrative. What other challenges await federal parties in another minority government situation?

Three former MPs with a wealth of experience on the Hill join The House to discuss the pressing issues facing party leaders on both sides of the aisle: former Liberal cabinet minister Ujjal Dosanjh, former Conservative minister James Moore and former NDP MP Olivia Chow.

Former Liberal minister Ujjal Dosanjh, former Conservative minister James Moore and former NDP MP Olivia Chow discuss the pressures facing parties on both sides of the aisle ahead of Parliament’s official return.

Canada's soft power sports prowess

Canadian, Mexican and U.S. leaders will soon gather for the "Three Amigos" trilateral summit in Washington. Another big international meeting is sure to grab plenty of attention next week: Canada and Mexico will go head-to-head in a major soccer match as they battle for a berth in the 2022 World Cup.

The Canadian men's soccer team is hoping to make it to the tournament for the first time since 1986. The House hears from experts and pundits about how the team's success could affect politics at home and abroad.

Canadian, Mexican, and U.S. leaders will soon meet at a trilateral summit. But there’s another big international meeting next week: Canada and Mexico go head-to-head in a soccer match that could have repercussions on the field and in politics.

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