The House

CBC Radio's The House: Generation COVID

On this week’s show: A special edition of The House examines the impact of COVID-19 on Canada’s youth, as three teens reflect on the consequences of closing schools and a panel of education experts explore how Canada can ensure kids don’t fall behind. Plus: Manitoba’s education minister discusses reforms to his province’s school system and Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough talks about blunting the negative effects of graduating in a pandemic.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

The pandemic has had profound effects on youth through school closures and lost job opportunities. (Kevin Mulcahy/Shutterstock )
On this week’s show: A special edition of The House examines the impact of COVID-19 on Canada’s youth, as three teens reflect on the consequences of closing schools and a panel of education experts explore how Canada can ensure kids don’t fall behind. Plus: Manitoba’s education minister discusses reforms to his province’s school system and Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough talks about blunting the negative effects of graduating in a pandemic. 49:34

Students under stress 

The United Nations has warned this cohort of students could face a "generational catastrophe" because of the pandemic's impact on education.

Host Chris Hall speaks with Stefania Giannini, assistant director general for education at UNESCO, about why the UN is so concerned about the learning-related impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The House also hears from students across the country — Alexandria Burton in Edmonton, Hannah Cohen in Toronto and Mohib Haque in Antigonish, N.S. — about their experiences flipping between online and in-person classes this year and what they hope will change for the fall.

UNESCO’s Assistant Director-General for Education Stefania Giannini discusses the pandemic’s impact on education and students Alexandria Burton, Hannah Cohen and Mohib Haque reflect on a challenging academic year. 15:00

Examining Canada's education system

The pandemic has shaken Canada's education systems, with provinces and school boards confronting challenge after challenge as they navigate a global health crisis. What needs to be done to ensure that kids are not left behind? How can education systems be improved?

The House checks in with a panel of education experts, including Dalhousie University professor Julia Wright, University of Ottawa professor Jenn Wallner and middle school teacher Matthew Morris.

Dalhousie University professor Julia Wright, University of Ottawa professor Jenn Wallner and middle school teacher Matthew Morris talk about how to ensure Canadian kids aren’t left behind and how educational systems can be improved. 14:19

Manitoba's major reforms to learning

Manitoba is planning a major overhaul of its education system as it looks to improve what are among the worst educational outcomes for students in the country. 

Provincial Education Minister Cliff Cullen discusses what Manitoba has learned from the pandemic — and why it's eliminating most of its elected school boards.

Education minister Cliff Cullen explains Manitoba’s move to eliminate most of its elected school boards and what the province has learned from the pandemic. 5:09

Graduating into a pandemic

Research shows that long-term youth unemployment can affect a person's earning potential for years after they graduate.

So how can the federal government ensure that those who are unlucky enough to graduate into a pandemic are not left behind? Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough joins host Chris Hall to discuss.

Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough discusses the federal government’s role in supporting graduates who are entering the workforce during the pandemic. 10:45

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