The House

CBC Radio's The House: Breaking the third wave

On this week’s show: Nova Scotia Premier Iain Rankin discusses his province’s efforts to fight its third wave of COVID-19. Plus — hear a panel of political strategists take on the Trudeau ethics probe, Bill C-10 and Quebec language laws; a dive into why some Indigenous groups support the shutdown of Enbridge’s Line 5 pipeline; a report on the rise of politician-hosted podcasts; and a look at the fate of summer camps during the pandemic.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

Premier Iain Rankin and Nova Scotia's Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Robert Strang during a COVID-19 briefing in March. (Communications Nova Scotia)
On this week’s show: Nova Scotia Premier Iain Rankin discusses his province’s efforts to fight its third wave of COVID-19. Plus — hear a panel of political strategists take on the Trudeau ethics probe, Bill C-10 and Quebec language laws; a dive into why some Indigenous groups support the shutdown of Enbridge’s Line 5 pipeline; a report on the rise of politician-hosted podcasts; and a look at the fate of summer camps during the pandemic. 48:01

Vaccines and the virus in Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia joined other provinces this week in limiting the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine, citing concerns over the risk of blood clotting and future supplies.

The province had been one of the success stories of the pandemic, recording new daily cases in the single digits until recent weeks. Now, it's dealing with more active cases than the rest of the Atlantic provinces combined. 

Premier Iain Rankin responded by imposing strict lockdown measures until at least the end of May to limit the spread of COVID-19. The premier joins host Chris Hall to discuss the state of the pandemic and the road ahead in his province.

As his province deals with more active cases than the rest of the Atlantic provinces combined, Premier Iain Rankin discusses the state of the pandemic and the road ahead in Nova Scotia. 8:34

Trudeau escapes an ethics strikeout

This week, Canada's ethics commissioner cleared Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of any substantive ethics violation over the WE Charity controversy — though he did observe Trudeau had the appearance of a conflict of interest.

Will the issue have lasting political legs? Or will Bill C-10, or new language laws in Quebec, take over the political discourse? Three panellists join The House to debate: David Herle, Liberal strategist and host of the Herle Burly podcast; Conservative strategist Semhar Tekeste; and NDP national director Anne McGrath.

Three panelists dissect the ethics commissioner’s findings from this week: Liberal strategist and host of the Herle Burly podcast, David Herle; Conservative strategist Semhar Tekeste; and NDP national director Anne McGrath. 13:21

The Line 5 battle continues

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer gave Enbridge a deadline of May 12 to shut down the Line 5 pipeline, but the Calgary company has not complied with that order as both sides continue mediation.

Whitney Gravelle, president of the Bay Mills Indian Community, was among a group of protesters who took to the streets in Michigan's Mackinaw City this week. She spoke with The House about why some Indigenous groups are demanding the shutdown of the pipeline.

Whitney Gravelle, president of the Bay Mills Indian Community, was among a group of protesters who took to the streets in Michigan this week. She explains why some Indigenous groups are demanding the shutdown of the Line 5 pipeline. 5:50

The rise of politicians' podcasts

Since the pandemic began, more than a dozen MPs, senators and other politicians have started their own political podcasts. CBC's Madeleine Cummings explores why so many elected officials are trying their hand at hosting. Some MPs say it's a way to connect with constituents, but political communication experts suggest it could be a way to control the narrative and circumvent the mainstream media.

CBC’s Madeleine Cummings explores the sudden explosion of podcasts hosted by politicians. Some MPs say it’s a way to connect with constituents, but political communication experts suggest it could be a way to control the narrative and circumvent the mainstream media. 7:01

Summer camps await the green light from governments

Across Canada, camp operators are waiting to hear from provincial governments about whether they'll be allowed to open their doors this summer. Many have lost more than 90 per cent of their revenue since the pandemic began. Only Quebec and New Brunswick have given camps the green light so far.

Stéphane Richard, president of the Canadian Camping Association, and Joanne Kates, director of Ontario's Camp Arowhon in Algonquin Park, talk about the kind of support camps want from governments.

Stéphane Richard, president of the Canadian Camping Association, and Joanne Kates, director of Ontario’s Camp Arowhon in Algonquin Park, discuss what support camps are hoping to see from governments as they await word on whether they can open their doors to kids this summer. 10:04

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