The House

CBC Radio's The House: What's next for the federal price on carbon?

On this week’s show: Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson discusses what’s next for the federal price on carbon and voters look at the Conservative Party’s stance on climate change. Plus: Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau talks China and COVID-19; Facebook’s Kevin Chan examines impending regulation in Canada; and Liberal MP John McKay calls for an increase in the powers of the human rights watchdog investigating Canadian companies abroad.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson, left, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hold a press conference on Nov. 19, 2020. The Supreme Court of Canada ruled this week the Liberals' carbon pricing regime is constitutional. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)
On this week’s show: Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson discusses what’s next for the federal price on carbon and voters look at the Conservative Party’s stance on climate change. Plus: Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau talks China and COVID-19; Facebook’s Kevin Chan examines impending regulation in Canada; and Liberal MP John McKay calls for an increase in the powers of the human rights watchdog investigating Canadian companies abroad.

Seeking national consensus on federal carbon pricing

Several premiers continue to push back at the Liberal government's price on carbon after the Supreme Court of Canada ruled this week that the federal law is constitutional.

Some provinces have opposed the law in court — arguing natural resources fall under provincial jurisdiction — while the federal Conservatives have vowed to scrap the tax altogether.

How will the government make the policy work when it doesn't have a national consensus? Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson joins The House to discuss.

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled this week that the Liberal government’s carbon pricing law is constitutional, but the regime still faces stiff opposition. Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson discusses how the government plans to make the issue a matter of national concern.

Canada's Conservatives and climate change

Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole made his views clear on the federal government's carbon pricing regime this week: as prime minister, he would scrap the tax and put forward a climate plan of his own.

His comments came less than a week after delegates to the Conservative Party policy convention voted to reject a resolution that declared climate change is real, despite O'Toole's plea for the party to change its approach to environmental issues. 

The House speaks with two Canadians — one current and one former member of the party — about O'Toole's vision for a bolder party and what they want to see from him next. 

Two Canadians — one current and one former member of the Conservative party — share their thoughts on the party’s climate change stance under leader Erin O’Toole, and what they want to see from him next.

Garneau on Canada's 'clear messages' to China and Russia

Earlier this week, Canada joined its allies in sanctioning top Chinese and Russian officials for human rights abuses committed in both countries. It was just one of several international issues that emerged during a busy week — including reports that the EU and India moved to restrict exports of COVID-19 vaccines they produce.

The House hears from Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau on the messages Canada is sending on all those matters and more. The minister tells host Chris Hall he plans to raise concerns over Brazil's handling of the pandemic with his foreign counterpart in the coming days.

The House hears from Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau on the messages Canada is sending after the federal government moved to sanction top Chinese and Russian officials.

Facebook invites regulation — but how much?

The Canadian government is moving ahead with a plan to require Facebook and other social media giants to pay domestic news organizations for content they link to on their sites.

Australia passed a similar law last month, following Facebook's decision to temporarily pull news content from its platform there. 

Could a similar showdown happen here? Facebook's global director and head of policy in Canada Kevin Chan joins The House to talk about why the company fought the Australian law, and whether it welcomes regulation here in Canada.

The federal government is moving ahead with plans to require Facebook and other social media giants to pay news organizations for content they link to on their sites. Facebook’s Kevin Chan discusses the company’s fight over similar legislation in Australia and whether it would be welcome here.

Giving the boot to politicians behaving badly

There are very few jurisdictions in Canada with a legal mechanism to fire a politician caught behaving badly.

But after public outcry over a handful of high-profile cases in Ontario and Alberta, governments are now considering legislation that could boot someone out of their job.

CBC's Joanne Chianello speaks to women looking for change and politicians who agree it's time.

If an elected politician behaves badly, there are very few jurisdictions in Canada where voters can oust them before the next election. The CBC’s Joanne Chianello speaks to voters and politicians who agree it’s time for change.

A watchdog with no teeth?

The office of the new Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise was established to investigate human rights abuses by Canadian companies operating overseas — but it can't compel those companies to testify or provide documents.

Liberal MP John McKay says that doesn't give the office enough power to meet its international human rights obligations. He tells The House why Canada needs a tougher watchdog, and why he's willing to challenge his own party over the issue.

This week, Liberal MP John McKay challenged his own government’s approach to investigating Canadian companies accused of human rights abuses. He tells The House why the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise should be given greater investigative powers.

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