The House

CBC Radio's The House: Border restrictions and a new face on the Supreme Court

On this week’s show: Public Safety Minister Bill Blair discusses the continued restrictions at the border. The Conservatives' foreign affairs critic Michael Chong talks about fighting the government over document disclosure. An expert panel analyzes the controversies and challenges facing the Green Party and its leader, Annamie Paul. Plus: a look at the new nominee to the Supreme Court.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

Vehicles cross the Blue Water Bridge over the St. Claire River to Port Huron, Michigan from Sarnia, Canada, on March 18, 2020 in Port Huron, Michigan. (Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images)
On this week’s show: Public Safety Minister Bill Blair discusses the continued restrictions at the border. The Conservatives' foreign affairs critic Michael Chong talks about fighting the government over document disclosure. An expert panel analyzes the controversies and challenges facing the Green Party and its leader, Annamie Paul. Plus: a look at the new nominee to the Supreme Court.

Border blues

The federal government has extended its border closures for another month and non-essential travel is off the table until at least July 21.

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Minister Bill Blair discusses loosening restrictions, his message to Canadians living in cross-border communities and the ArriveCAN app — the government's new tool to provide mandatory travel information for anyone entering Canada.

Public Safety Minister Bill Blair talks about the government's extension of the Canada-U.S. border closure, the ArriveCAN app for travellers and criminal justice reform.

Public Health Agency found in contempt of Parliament

The House of Commons voted Thursday to find the Public Health Agency of Canada in contempt of Parliament for refusing to hand over unredacted documents related to the firing of two scientists at a lab in Winnipeg.

The Public Health Agency of Canada has defied the order before, citing privacy and national security concerns. The Conservatives' foreign affairs critic Michael Chong joins Chris Hall to talk about whether he expects the head of PHAC to appear on Monday, and how far the opposition is willing to push this issue.

Conservative Foreign Affairs critic Michael Chong joins Chris Hall to talk about the fight over disclosing documents related to the firing of two scientists at a lab in Winnipeg.

Green Party turmoil

The Green Party of Canada is facing perhaps the biggest challenge in its history. After Fredericton MP Jenica Atwin crossed the floor to join the Liberals, members of the party raised concerns about the leadership of Annamie Paul.

The new leader has fought back against her critics, saying that some of the allegations levelled at her are racist and sexist. The CBC's David Thurton and Shachi Kurl of the Angus Reid Institute discuss what this means for the party and its political prospects.

An expert panel breaks down a week of controversy for the Green Party and its leader, Annamie Paul, who is now fighting to stay on as leader.

Mandatory minimums set to stay? 

The House of Commons is set to rise for its summer break soon and if an election is called before Parliament resumes in September, some of the government's proposed legislation won't make it into law.

One of those bills is C-22 — legislation that would repeal the mandatory minimum sentences for drug crimes and some other offences brought in by the Conservatives. In a special report, The House talks to Sen. Kim Pate, lawyers Janani Shanmuganathan and Lisa Kerr, and recovered drug addict Guy Felicella about why they want the government to prioritize this piece of legislation.

A feature documentary on mandatory minimum sentences and efforts to repeal them with Bill C-22, a proposed law which may not survive the end of this Parliamentary session.

Canada's new supreme court justice

The Liberal government has announced its next nominee to the Supreme Court of Canada. Ontario Court of Appeals Justice Mahmud Jamal is poised to become the first person of colour appointed to the top court.

The House hears from Charlene Theodore, the first Black lawyer to head the Ontario Bar Association, about Jamal's work and what the appointment means for the Supreme Court.

Mahmud Jamal is set to become the first person of colour appointed on Canada's top court. The House hears from Charlene Theodore, the first Black lawyer to head the Ontario Bar Association, about Jamal’s work and what the appointment means for the Supreme Court.

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now