The House

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On this week’s show: U.S. Ambassador David Cohen kicks off a special episode on the Canada-U.S. relationship. Canadian senator Peter Boehm and the governor of New Jersey, Phil Murphy, discuss the state of democracy in both countries. Plus — Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland gives her take on the bilateral relationship and NORAD commander Gen. Glen VanHerck talks about efforts to modernize the continental air defence force.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

Canadian and United States flags fly near the Ambassador Bridge, connecting Windsor, Ontario with Detroit, Michigan. (Rob Gurdebeke/The Canadian Press)
On this week’s show: U.S. Ambassador David Cohen kicks off a special episode on the Canada-U.S. relationship. Canadian senator Peter Boehm and the governor of New Jersey, Phil Murphy, discuss the state of democracy in both countries. Plus — Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland gives her take on the bilateral relationship and NORAD commander Gen. Glen VanHerck talks about efforts to modernize the continental air defence force.

Democratic doldrums?

Friends. Allies. Even family. The Canada-U.S. relationship is this country's most important bilateral tie, but how strong is the relationship now, and what might test it in the future? 

American ambassador to Canada David Cohen spoke to The House — as he prepared to host an Independence Day party at his official residence — about whether the relationship between two peaceful democratic neighbours is being taken for granted. 

Many Canadians and Americans are becoming increasingly concerned about a deterioration of democratic norms and attitudes south of the border. But Canada faces its own challenges, with a portion of the population that has become disengaged with the political system. 

How deep-seated are the problems in each country, and how can they be fixed? Canadian senator and former ambassador Peter Boehm and Phil Murphy, the governor of New Jersey, join The House to discuss.

American ambassador to Canada David Cohen talks to The House about the Canada-U.S. relationship, then Governor of New Jersey Phil Murphy and Canadian senator Peter Boehm sit down to discuss the state of democracy in Canada and the United States.

Freeland on the land of the free

No cabinet minister has had more influence over the Canada-U.S. relationship over the last seven years than Chrystia Freeland. As international trade minister she worked on commercial irritants, as foreign minister she renegotiated NAFTA with the Trump administration, and now as finance minister and deputy prime minister she remains one of the most senior voices on how Canada approaches our neighbour to the south.

Freeland talks with Chris Hall about what this country can do to keep the relationship on track.

Deputy prime minister and finance minister Chrystia Freeland sits down with Chris Hall to talk about what this country can do to keep its most important bilateral relationship — with the United States — on track.

NORAD's future

The world's only binational military command got a significant influx of cash last week, when the federal government pledged billions of dollars to modernize NORAD — the North American Aerospace Defense Command. Canada has committed to developing new surveillance systems, air-to-air missiles and other equipment and infrastructure to help improve military capabilities in the Arctic. 

But what threats is the investment meant to counter? How long until all those capabilities are in place? And is the investment enough to build a place for NORAD in a post-Cold War world? NORAD Commander General Glen VanHerck joins Chris Hall to discuss.

NORAD Commander General Glen VanHerck joins Chris Hall to discuss recent investments made by the Canadian government in his binational force and what he sees as the biggest threats to North America.

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