The House

CBC Radio's The House: Living with COVID

On this week’s show: Nova Scotia’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Robert Strang discusses living with COVID as Omicron continues to spread. Two health policy experts dig into political leadership at this stage of the pandemic. Plus — a look at the historic $40 billion child welfare agreement struck by First Nations leaders and the federal government, and reflections on the storming of the U.S. Capitol, one year later.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

People wait in line at a walk-in COVID-19 test site in Toronto on Wednesday, December 22, 2021. (Chris Young/Canadian Press)
On this week’s show: Nova Scotia’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Robert Strang discusses living with COVID as Omicron continues to spread. Two health policy experts dig into political leadership at this stage of the pandemic. Plus — a look at the historic $40 billion child welfare agreement struck by First Nations leaders and the federal government, and reflections on the storming of the U.S. Capitol, one year later.

Coping with Omicron

As the rapid spread of the Omicron variant leads to renewed health restrictions in many parts of the country, some medical experts and politicians are saying Canadians will have to live with COVID-19.

It's a significant shift in approach for some parts of the country — like Nova Scotia, which saw lower rates of infection prior to Omicron. Now, the province's Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Robert Strang is talking about what it means to "live with COVID." He sits down with host Chris Hall to explain.

Then, political science professors Katherine Fierlbeck of Dalhousie University and John Church of the University of Alberta discuss political leadership at this point in the pandemic. What message should elected leaders be sending as Canada enters a third year of battling COVID-19?

Nova Scotia’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Robert Strang talks about what it means to “live with COVID” and political scientists Katherine Fierlbeck and John Church discuss political leadership at this point in the pandemic.

Reflections on the landmark First Nations child welfare agreement

On Jan. 4, the federal government and First Nations leaders announced details of a historic $40 billion agreement-in-principle to compensate young people harmed by Canada's child welfare system. The deal sets aside $20 billion for compensation and $20 billion for long-term reform of the on-reserve child welfare system.

jaye simpson, an Oji-Cree Saulteaux person from Sapotaweyak Cree Nation, spent 16 years in the system. Now 27 years old, simpson joins The House to share their experience in care and explain why news of the agreement is bittersweet.

jaye simpson, an Oji-Cree Saulteaux person from Sapotaweyak Cree Nation, spent 16 years in the on-reserve child welfare system and reflects on the new compensation agreement reached between First Nations leaders and the federal government.

One year since the attack on the Capitol

This week marks a year since Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to disrupt the certification of Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential election. Do persisting anti-democratic attitudes present an ongoing threat to the American system?

The House re-airs a 2021 interview with Rep. Susan Wild, captured less than a day after the attack. Then, Richard Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Irvine and co-director of the Fair Elections and Free Speech Center, joins the program to discuss the threat posed by authoritarian impulses in the land of the free.

Host Chris Hall revisits a Jan. 2021 interview with U.S. Congresswoman Susan Wild the day after rioters attacked the Capitol and law professor Richard Hasen discusses what he sees as the ongoing threat to American democracy.

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