The House

CBC Radio's The House: Protest convoy rolls into Ottawa

On this week’s show: Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough responds to the arrival of a convoy of protesters in Ottawa, Conservative MP Melissa Lantsman explains her party’s position on the demonstrators and CBC reporters offer updates on the protests. Also on the show: security expert Matthew Schmidt unpacks Canada’s security promises to Ukraine and the CBC’s Meera Bains speaks to parents in B.C. about the rollout of the federal child care deal. Plus — a look back at the Quebec City mosque attack, five years later.

Here is what's on this week's episode of The House

Hundreds of people gather by TransCanada Highway 20 to show their support for protesters heading to Ottawa to demonstrate against COVID-19 restrictions on Friday, Jan. 28, 2022 in Levis, Que. (Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press)
On this week’s show: Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough responds to the arrival of a convoy of protesters in Ottawa, Conservative MP Melissa Lantsman explains her party’s position on the demonstrators and CBC reporters offer updates on the protests. Also on the show: security expert Matthew Schmidt unpacks Canada’s security promises to Ukraine and the CBC’s Meera Bains speaks to parents in B.C. about the rollout of the federal child care deal. Plus — a look back at the Quebec City mosque attack, five years later.

The trucks stop here

Protesters from across Canada are gathering in Ottawa this weekend to speak out against vaccine mandates, COVID-19 restrictions and the Trudeau government. Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough is one of three cabinet ministers who issued a joint statement this week with the Canadian Trucking Alliance in support of vaccines. She sits down to discuss the government's position.

Plus, Conservative transport critic Melissa Lantsman discusses her party's position on the demonstrators and Opposition Leader Erin O'Toole's plans to meet with some of them. CBC's Janyce McGregor and Shannon Proudfoot of Maclean's also join the program to break down the political risk the protests pose for federal parties.

Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough responds to the arrival of a convoy of protesters in Ottawa; Conservative MP Melissa Lantsman details her party’s position; and CBC’s Janyce McGregor and Shannon Proudfoot of Maclean’s break down the political risks associated with the protests.

Canada's promises to Ukraine

Canada is expanding its training missing in Ukraine by sending 60 more troops right away. But it's not sending the lethal weapons the Ukrainians requested. Will Canada's help make a difference as Russia breathes down Ukraine's neck?

Professor Matthew Schmidt, an expert on defence and foreign policy at the University of New Haven and a former strategic adviser to the U.S. Army, explains the strategy behind the West's support and the role Canada is playing. 

As Canada expands its training mission in Ukraine, defence and foreign policy expert Matthew Schmidt of the University of New Haven explains the strategy behind the West’s support.

B.C. parents on child care changes

This week, Nunavut inked a child care deal with the federal government, leaving Ontario the only jurisdiction without an such an agreement.

CBC's Meera Bains reports from British Columbia — the first province to sign on to the federal plan last summer — on the difference the deal has made to parents in the province so far, and what still needs to be done.

CBC’s Meera Bains reports from British Columbia — the first province to ink a child-care deal with the federal government — on what difference the deal has made to parents so far, and what still needs to be done.

Remembering Quebec City mosque shooting victims

Saturday marks five years since a gunman walked into a prayer room in a Quebec City mosque and killed six people. Last year, the federal government proclaimed January 29 a national day of remembrance.

Mohamed Labidi was vice-president of the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City when the tragedy hit. He tells The House how he and other members of Quebec's Muslim community will be remembering the victims, five years on.

Five years after a gunman opened fire at a Quebec City mosque, Mohamed Labidi talks about how his community remembers the victims.

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